Posted in halloween, Health, news

Beware of Halloween Candy Laced with Drugs

An Ohio boy has tested positive for methamphetamines after suffering a seizure when he ingested a piece of Halloween candy.

This comes after officials in Europe warned of methametamine tablets made to look like hard candy.

5 year-old Braylen Carwell began having a facial droop on the left side of his face, could not move his left arm, and was disoriented to time and place.  The Galion Police Department examined the candy as well has his fake vampire teeth, issuing a warning to parents and residents to look for tampering of not only candy but their necklaces, fake teeth, rings and other accessories.

He is expected to fully recover, but parents need to be aware that kids can be easily introduced to drugs and other contaminants while trick or treating and to enforce the “no candy till we inspect it” rule.

Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween is one of the deadliest days of the year for pediatric pedestrian fatalities, and parents additionally need to be aware of fire and choking hazards.  We therefore recommend the following to keep our kids safe.

  1.  Make sure your child’s mask allows him/her to see clearly.  If not, replace with non-toxic makeup that is tested a few days before on a small area of skin on their arm to ensure they are not allergic.  The makeup should be washed off before bedtime.

 

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2.  Avoid long costumes, such as ghost-themed, that may trip your child while they walk/run.

3. Use bright-colored costumes. If your child insists on a dark costume, such as Batman, put a belt of glow sticks around him or add reflective tape to their costume and trick or treat bags

4. Make sure all costumes and hats are flame resistant and teach your kids how to avoid tripping over jack-o-lanterns with candles in them.

5. Avoid costume contact lenses as they may decrease visual acuity, scratch the eye and cause infection.

contact lens.jpeg

 

6. Use the sidewalk.  Your child will want to zig zag across the street when they see everyone else doing it.  You need to be the parent like me who yells at everyone to get back on the sidewalk.

7. Watch out for drunk drivers.  Many are coming back from a “trick or drink” party and could be impaired.

8.  Make the “no eating candy until you get home” rule.  Allows you to check the candy for open wrappers and dangerous things that don’t belong.  Then steal your favorite treats when the child is taking his/her potty break

9. Teach your child to not enter a stranger’s home – even if it is in full decoration

10. Stay in a group and follow your children. You can leave a safe distance behind while still supervise. And its fun when we parents compete for who can yell at our kids the loudest.

11. Carry Walkie Talkies.  Halloween streets get loud and kids may not hear you if they start walking down a different street and turn into a housing complex.  Walkie talkies are fun and keep you connecting with your younglings’ even if they are a few feet away.

12. Parents should avoid “Trick-o-Drink!!”ing where we walk around with our red plastic cup and rather than ask for candy, we opt for some spirits poured in.  Parents giggle, feeling apart of the festivities, but unfortunately will be sloshed by the fourth home they hit and won’t be able to effectively supervise the children.  We need to be at the top of our game this Halloween.  Cut the booze.

13. And drivers, be wary of trick-or-treaters even before it gets dark.  Drive slowly and pay attention!  Let’s have a Happy and Safe one!!!

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in Beauty, Health, news

Eyelash Extension Cited as Cause of Temporary Blindness

A 20-year-old student this week “lost” her sight for 2 hours after getting eye lash extensions at a salon.

Megan Rixon tweeted on October 19th she visited a new salon in the UK and within hours suffered a severe allergic reaction to the glue, she claims was nail glue.

 

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She tweeted: Girls be very very careful where you get your eyelashes done!!I got my individuals done today somewhere new and it turns out they used nail glue on my lashes. I genuinely lost my sight for 2 hours. Thankfully the swelling has gone down, but there still very sore. Be careful😭

She urges everyone to have a “glue test”, to test for sensitivity and to ask the technician to show you the actual glue being used.

Acrylic and Gel Nail “Allergy” Warning

Skin experts are warning that chemicals used in acrylic and gel nail polish may induce an allergic reaction.

Methacrylates appear to be the culprit, causing rash and itching not only in the fingers but other parts of the body, including genitalia.  Some may experience losing their nail after a reaction.

 

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METHYL METHACRYLATE

Once the immune system is triggered, allergic symptoms could surface in other parts of the body.

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The British Association of Dermatologists warns 2.4% of the population could be at risk.

The nail industry is a multibillion dollar industry with hundreds of thousands of customers each year.

Methacrylates are used in a variety of industries in adhesives, plastics, paints and even medical and dental devices.

Eyelash glue and home nail kits can also expose users to methacrylate.  Many have reported allergic reactions of their eyelid after having lash extensions applied.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in Health, news, pets

Our Pets CAN Tell Time

We pet owners have always suspected it…..our cats jump on us moments before our alarm goes off and our dogs sit by the front door at 5:45 pm each weeknight.   Why? Because they can tell time, well figuratively that is, with science to prove it.

 

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Daniel Dombeck, the associate professor of neurobiology at Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and colleagues, found the part of an animal’s brain that comprised “timing cells” or neurons that would give animals a sense of when something was supposed to happen. In mice this was found to occur in the medial entorhinal cortex of the temporal lobe.

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According to news.northwestern.edu:

When planning the study, Dombeck’s team focused on the medial entorhinal cortex, an area located in the brain’s temporal lobe that is associated with memory and navigation. Because that part of the brain encodes spatial information in episodic memories, Dombeck hypothesized that the area could also be responsible for encoding time.
“Every memory is a bit different,” said James Heys, a postdoctoral fellow in Dombeck’s laboratory. “But there are two central features to all episodic memories: space and time. They always happen in a particular environment and are always structured in time.”
To test their hypothesis, Dombeck and Heys set up an experiment called the virtual “door stop” task. In the experiment, a mouse runs on a physical treadmill in a virtual reality environment. The mouse learns to run down a hallway to a door that is located about halfway down the track. After six seconds, the door opens, allowing the mouse to continue down the hallway to receive its reward.
After running several training sessions, researchers made the door invisible in the virtual reality scene. In the new scenario, the mouse still knew where the now-invisible “door” was located based on the floor’s changing textures. And it still waited six seconds at the “door” before abruptly racing down the track to collect its reward.
“The important point here is that the mouse doesn’t know when the door is open or closed because it’s invisible,” said Heys, the paper’s first author. “The only way he can solve this task efficiently is by using his brain’s internal sense of time.”

Our pets’ sense of timing is instinctive and therefore not surprising, as animals have always had the ability to sense the time of day when their prey comes to the water hole or when they to avoid the night prowlers starting their hunt.

So although our humanization of pets may seem cute at first, we should proceed with caution as animals possess many of the same intellectual capabilities as humans.  They’re smart….too smart…..and the more details scientists unlock in their furry heads, the more we learn of how similar they are to us. And I’m not sure I want to know what they’re truly thinking.  Ignorance is bliss…..

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

 

Posted in halloween, Health, news

Halloween Safety Tips

Ghosts, goblins, Mommy yelling – Halloween can be pretty scary.  But the candy, the costumes, decorations and running door to door threatening all your neighbors with a “trick” makes it one of the most exciting days of the year!
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Unfortunately, the more fun and immersed into the festivities, the more dangerous for our little ones.  160,000 injuries occur on this day each year, and even scarier, Halloween is the deadliest for pediatric pedestrians with 7300 fatalities reported annually by the National Safety Council.

Thousands have petitioned the White House this year to move Halloween officially to the last Saturday of October to avoid families rushing home on a work/school night to start the festivities.

However, any day kids are running around in a quest to find sugar puts them at risk and no holiday should end so tragically.

 

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In addition to traffic accidents, parents need to be aware of fire and choking hazards.  We therefore recommend the following to keep our kids safe.

  1.  Make sure your child’s mask allows him/her to see clearly.  If not, replace with non-toxic makeup that is tested a few days before on a small area of skin on their arm to ensure they are not allergic.  The makeup should be washed off before bedtime.

 

masks.jpg

2.  Avoid long costumes, such as ghost-themed, that may trip your child while they walk/run.

3. Use bright-colored costumes. If your child insists on a dark costume, such as Batman, put a belt of glow sticks around him or add reflective tape to their costume and trick or treat bags

4. Make sure all costumes and hats are flame resistant and teach your kids how to avoid tripping over jack-o-lanterns with candles in them.

5. Avoid costume contact lenses as they may decrease visual acuity, scratch the eye and cause infection.

contact lens.jpeg

 

6. Use the sidewalk.  Your child will want to zig zag across the street when they see everyone else doing it.  You need to be the parent like me who yells at everyone to get back on the sidewalk.

7. Watch out for drunk drivers.  Many are coming back from a “trick or drink” party and could be impaired.

8.  Make the “no eating candy until you get home” rule.  Allows you to check the candy for open wrappers and dangerous things that don’t belong.  Then steal your favorite treats when the child is taking his/her potty break

9. Teach your child to not enter a stranger’s home – even if it is in full decoration

10. Stay in a group and follow your children. You can leave a safe distance behind while still supervise. And its fun when we parents compete for who can yell at our kids the loudest.

11. Carry Walkie Talkies.  Halloween streets get loud and kids may not hear you if they start walking down a different street and turn into a housing complex.  Walkie talkies are fun and keep you connecting with your younglings’ even if they are a few feet away.

12. Parents should avoid “Trick-o-Drink!!”ing where we walk around with our red plastic cup and rather than ask for candy, we opt for some spirits poured in.  Parents giggle, feeling apart of the festivities, but unfortunately will be sloshed by the fourth home they hit and won’t be able to effectively supervise the children.  We need to be at the top of our game this Halloween.  Cut the booze.

 

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13. And drivers, be wary of trick-or-treaters even before it gets dark.  Drive slowly and pay attention!  Let’s have a Happy and Safe one!!!

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, medications, news

Common Blood Pressure Medication Linked to Lung Cancer

A study, published in the BMJ, finds those who take ACE inhibitors are 14% more likely to develop lung cancer.

The study took place in the UK and studied close to 1 million patients over the time period of 1995-2015 and found the longer one took the blood pressure medication, the higher the risk in developing lung cancer.

Over 100 million adults in the US have high blood pressure, and ACE inhibitors are one of the most popular treatments due to their low-cost and efficacy.

They work by blocking an enzyme in the angiotensin-renin system, resulting in blood vessel relaxation and a lowering of blood pressure.

 

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One side effect, however, may be coughing due to the accumulation of bradykinin, and researchers believe this could be the culprit in the increased risk of lung cancer.

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Common ACE inhibitors include ramipril, captopril, lisinopril and benazepril.

However, since lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, blood pressure is one of the most common types of conditions and ACE inhibitors are one the most commonly used blood pressure medications, the association may be coincidental and not a cause and effect.

More research needs to be done on the long-term use of the medications as uncontrolled blood pressure can link to heart disease, stroke and dementia.

 

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in flu, Health, news

New Flu Medication May Save Lives This Flu Season

The FDA has approved a new drug, Xofluza (baloxavir marboxil), to help fight the flu this season.

The antiviral is a single dose and is taken within 48 hours of first signs of flu symptoms.

It is only indicated in those older than 12 years old.  The cost is approximately $150 for the single dose.

Current antiviral medications approved by the FDA to shorten the course of the flu include Relenza and Tamiflu.  These medications are in a class of neuraminidase inhibitors, which inhibit the release of new viral particles that have replicated in a host (patient).

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Xofluza, however, works sooner, by preventing the virus from replicating within the host cell in the first place.

Therefore this new drug can stop the spread of flu earlier than its predecessors.

NBC News reported the following:

A 2016-2017 study in 1,436 people in the U.S. and Japan showed the one-dose pill cut the time people were sick to 2.5 days, from about 3.3 days. It cut how long people had a fever from an average of 42 hours to just one day. It also reduced what’s called viral shedding from four days to just one day.

So the less time one is sick with the flu, the less risk of coming down with a secondary infection such as pneumonia, or other flu related illness.

Moreover if viral shedding is decreased, less family members and contacts can potentially become ill.

Now Xofluza may not prevent the flu in one who has not been exposed because it works by preventing virus that is present from replicating.

Flu symptoms may come abruptly and include:

  • Fever
  • Body Aches
  • Cough
  • Sneezing
  • Sore Throat
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

The most effective way to prevent the flu is avoidance of sick contacts, good hand washing and vaccination.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

 

 

Posted in halloween, Health, news

CDC Warns to NOT Dress Up Your Chickens for Halloween

As more and more Americans adopt chickens as pets, the CDC has been compelled to issue a warning to not dress up the fowl friend for Halloween.

 

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A chicken as Yoda

 

Live chickens can carry Salmonella, a bacteria easily transmitted when handling the bird.

It’s becoming a status symbol to own a pet chicken, and fancy coops can cost close to $100,000.

 

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Countryliving.com  a $100,000 Nieman Marcus chicken coop

 

Currently the CDC is battling a salmonella outbreak of 92 cases in 29 states, with 21 people hospitalized after handling or consuming raw poultry.

Symptoms of salmonella poisoning include fever, chills, rash, diarrhea and stomach cramps within 12-72 hours after exposure. The illness can last 4-7 days, although most people will recover without treatment.

So don’t handle your chickens but if you can’t resist and need to put the firefighter costume on one, please wash your hands and keep them away from other trick-or-treaters.

 

Chicken-Firefighter-Halloween

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in Education, Health, students

Interview Tips for Residency Programs

Updated 6/9/2020

Thousands of medical students are hitting the final stretch of their medical school education and beginning to embark on one of the most critical times of their career…choosing a residency and applying for a position.

Despite one’s academic prowess, however, the interview could make or break an applicant.

Therefore, let’s get you ready for the biggest job interview of your life.

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Know your audience

Every residency program is different. And each one has defining elements.  So don’t make the assumption that all hospitals, doctors, staff and teaching programs are the same.

Do your research before your interview, and know inside and out what makes them tick.

  • The services they offer that other institutions don’t
  • The type of community they serve
  • Current research studies
  • What are they known to have excelled at or trail-blazed

It might even help to read up on the program director and see what he/she published.

Why?? Because the first question they ask you is:

Why did you choose our residency?

Know the specialty you’re applying for

This may seem like a no-brainer but many students will, when nerves take over, cite  misconceptions or negative stereotypes of the field their entering.

For example one may cite during a surgical residency interview that they “Prefer cutting over figuring out what the patient has.”

Or during a family medicine interview say, “I don’t like working in the hospital,” or “I would rather be a Jack-Of-All-Trades, than specializing in one subject.”

These answers could make the interviewer cringe.  So the following examples may be better statements:

Surgery – “I enjoy working with both my mind and my hands when it comes to the vast amounts of pathology one sees as a surgeon.”

Family Medicine – “I enjoy working with the family as a unit and am excited to have the capability to treat those of all ages.”

Internal Medicine – “I’m fascinated by the complexity of cases seen in internal medicine and how the history and physical exams skills we learned in medical school can be just as accurate as the most powerful imaging study used when determining what is wrong with a patient.”

Pediatrics – “Children make me laugh and smile and to be able to do that every work day is a rarity in many professions and specialties.”

Remember it’s an interview

Dr. Thomas Hunt, Program Director, Valley Health System Family Medicine Residency Program, states:

Generally programs are looking for a good fit – fit to the specialty, culture, community, and mission of the program. Each program will weigh elements of your application differently, taking into account your transcripts, scores, letter of recommendation, etc. looking for candidates that best adhere to their “Ideal” resident.
That being said, the best advice I can give to students interviewing for residencies this season is to relax, be yourself, and remember that you are interviewing the program as much as they are interviewing you. Watch how the faculty, staff, and residents interact with one another and ask yourself “How do I see myself fitting into this program over the next 3 to 5 years? Is this what I am looking for? Will I be happy and thrive in this environment?”

So remember…. it’s an interview.  The reason why you are sitting before them is because they liked what they saw on paper but now they need to see how you act, speak, and compose yourself in person.  So the same rules apply.

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  • Thank them before and after the interview, using a handshake when appropriate
  • Dress professionally, but comfortably so you appear comfortable and professional
  • Avoid slang and overly wordy responses
  • Keep giggles to a minimum, even if they make a funny joke
  • Be respectful
  • Be gracious to everyone with whom you come into contact with that day from the security guard to the program director to the parking attendant
  • Be humble
  • If a question seems random, and you don’t know the answer, respond with, “That’s a good question, let me give some thought into my answer before I respond,” to provide you with some pause to collect your thoughts.

Why should they pick you?

Each program is being inundated with applications and your competition is fierce. However, don’t let that over-intimidate you.  The fact that you clutched an interview means you are already ahead of the pack.  Now you need to convince them they made the right choice in choosing to interview you.

  1.  Remark how appreciative you are in them giving you the opportunity to interview for such a highly coveted position.
  2. Highlight your strengths and how they can be of benefit to their residency
  3. If you are multilingual, don’t hold your tongue, let them know!
  4. If you did an audition rotation there and worked well with the residency team (less transitioning needed) remind them of how well you all worked together
  5. If your academics and board scores are strong, gently remind them you are a strong test taker (it can enhance their Step/Level 3 test score average)
  6. Some may straight up ask what three things make you valuable for their residency program, so be prepared to answer this and other questions (see below.)
  7. Discuss how you want to become apart of the community in which the residency resides and help continue their good work.

Many programs want to train those who will stay instate and provide much-needed care to their residents.  If you do plan on living in the state in which you train, make sure you let them know!

Will they try to trip you up?

The short answer….No.   Program directors don’t have time to waste by choosing applicants and then scaring them off or tricking them into performing badly.

However, they are going to want to get to know you.  Residents and their attendings are committed to working with each other anywhere from 3-5 years and your future boss wants to know you can make the cut and work well with others.  Don’t be afraid to show some personality but remember to be brief and continue to allow them control of the interview.

Smile…you’re on CAMERA

Many interviews are now being conducted online, virtually. This can pose advantageous for some, disadvantageous for others.

Many of us rely on “distractors” during interviewing by using body language, hand gestures, or even our application/CV that lies between the applicant and interviewer.

Video interviews change that and can put all the focus on one’s face. So here are pointers to help you prepare for your “virtual interview”.

  • Test the lighting and your screen before the interview, making sure you view yourself as they will see you.
  • Make sure the light source is shining on you to avoid shadows.
  • Choose an area for your interview that appears professional and clean.
  • If you have a pet do not allow them into your interview area (cats love to hog the camera)
  • Try to wear clothing with solid colors rather than patterns. Choose ties/accessories that are professional looking (avoid the outlandish).
  • Avoid heavy makeup as camera lighting can add more shadows making one’s light makeup appear excessive.
  • If you have facial hair, remember to trim and shoot for a clean look. If shaving, do so a few hours prior to the interview to avoid fresh nicks/bleeding. Neck stubble may appear more prominent on video so consider a clean shave in those areas.
  • Try elevating the camera/laptop with books, boxes to have a slight angle. Looking up at the camera for some offers a more slender, cleaner look than looking down. However, as discussed earlier, test your image first before going live.
  • Practice a mock interview and review your video. Watch for lip biting, facial grimaces and saying “Uh” multiple times. Although it’s hard to watch ourselves on tape we learn a lot about what other people can see and this will give you an opportunity to improve your skills.
  • Finally…..wear pants! Even if you think the camera will only video waist up, it’s not worth the risk.

So what are some sample questions?

You might be asked any of the following:

  • Why did you choose our residency?
  • What made you choose this specialty?
  • How would you define our specialty?
  • What do you like about our institution?
  • What do you dislike about our program?
  • What sub-specialty are you interested in?
  • Where do you want to live once you graduate?
  • Do you work well with others?
  • Give me an example of when you had a conflict with a coworker and how did it get resolved.
  • What are your strengths?
  • What are your weaknesses?
  • Tell me about your research.
  • Tell me about your volunteer work.
  • Tell me about your community service.
  • Have you had any leadership roles?
  • Briefly touch upon some of your academic challenges.
  • What do you do for fun?
  • What are your hobbies?
  • How do you relieve stress?
  • Do you have family and friends who support your career choice?
  • Do you read books, and what book are you currently reading?
  • Describe a challenging patient case you’ve come across.
  • How would you approach a colleague who is abusing narcotics?
  • Where do you see yourself in 5-10 years?
  • Do you have any questions for me?

For the final question, refrain from asking the interviewer questions that are easily answered on their website or catalog.  Use the opportunity to show off your interests whether it’s regarding what research, community partnership, or teaching opportunities exist.  You can also ask them what they like about the program, why they chose to teach there, and what they would like to see in terms of evolution and progress.

After the interview

You will thank them and shake their hand but when you return home send a thank you note for their time.  Don’t stress over how your interview went.  Most likely you performed better than you thought.  Moreover expect your skills to improve with each interview.  Some suggest to leave your favorite picks to the end until you gained more practice, however, some may argue to not allow the interviewer to get “applicant fatigue” such that by the time they meet you they have made their choice.

Practice with classmates or faculty if you need and remember to prepare.

Finally, realize that you have interacted with hundreds if not thousands of individuals in your lifetime whether they were students, patients or faculty and are very skilled at what you do.  If not you wouldn’t be about to graduate medical school.  You got this!! Crush it!

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The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in art, Health, news

Eye Condition Might Have Helped Leonardo da Vinci Create His Masterpieces

A British researcher believes the Renaissance artisan, Leonardo da Vinci, had an eye condition called strabismus, or “lazy eye”, providing him a different sense of depth when it came to painting.

His specific strabismus was an exotropia, in which one eye moves outward, out of sync with the unaffected eye.

 

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Study author, Christopher Tyler, professor at City University of London and the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, states, “One of the things he is most famous for is his 3-D modeling [in which he adds] up to 30 layers of shading to get the subtle gradients.

“This is the kind of cue you don’t notice if you have full 3-D vision, but [it] can become more apparent if you shut — or shut off — one eye.”

Interestingly, in one of his famous works, the Mona Lisa, one could see a swelling of her left hand.

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She was the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, and appears to have a lump under her second finger.  This could have been a ganglion cyst or a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath.

Strabismus affects 4% of Americans, many of whom do not feel any visual deficits.  Some, however, may infer a strain of the field of vision, and some may incur double vision.

Treatment may include glasses, eye therapy, and surgery.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in food, Health, news

Drug-Resistant Salmonella Sickens 92 Across 29 States

The CDC has reported 92 people, 21 of whom needed hospitalization, after eating chicken tainted with an antibiotic resistant form of Salmonella.

Fortunately, no deaths have been reported.

Experts found the bacterial strain of Salmonella infantis on various raw chicken products.

No discrete source, or brand of chicken, has been identified or named by the CDC.

For treatment, the CDC recommends the following:

Common first-line oral antibiotics for susceptible Salmonella infections are fluoroquinolones (for adults) and azithromycin (for children). Ceftriaxone is an alternative first-line treatment agent.

Salmonella is commonly associated with raw poultry, as well as eggs, and cooking thoroughly until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees is recommended prior to cooling and consuming.  Moreover washing kitchen counters and cookware that touched the raw chicken is paramount to avoiding contamination by Salmonella.

 

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SALMONELLA:  IMAGE FROM THE CDC

 

Symptoms of salmonella poisoning include fever, chills, rash, diarrhea and stomach cramps within 12-72 hours after exposure. The illness can last 4-7 days, although most people will recover without treatment.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada