Posted in disease, Entertainment, Health, news, Parkinson's

Ozzy Osbourne Reveals He Has Parkinson’s Disease

In an interview on Good Morning America, Ozzy Osbourne, 71, revealed that he was recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

He describes he recently had a cervical spine surgery and then was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disorder:

“I got a numbness down this arm for the surgery, my legs keep going cold,” he said. “I don’t know if that’s the Parkinson’s or what, you know, but that’s — see, that’s the problem. Because they cut nerves when they did the surgery. I’d never heard of nerve pain, and it’s a weird feeling.”

He continues:

“Coming from a working class background, I hate to let people down. I hate to not do my job,” said Osbourne. “And so when I see my wife goin’ to work, my kids goin’ to work, everybody’s doing — tryin’ to be helpful to me, that gets me down because I can’t contribute to my family, you know.”
“But you know, put it this way — I’m a lot better now than I was last February. I was in a shocking state.”

 

What is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, next to Alzheimer’s, and the most common movement disorder that affects 1% of the world’s population over 60 years old. In the US, 60,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.  It affects several areas of the brain, primarily the substantia nigra, altering balance and movement by affecting dopamine producing cells.

 

substantia nigra

IMAGE FROM THE SCIENCE OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE

 

It was first described in 1817 by James Parkinson as a “shaking palsy.”

What are the Symptoms of Parkinson’s?

Common symptoms of Parkinson’s include:

  • Stiffness and rigidity
  • Poor balance
  • Tremor at rest, especially a pill-rolling tremor
  • Slow movement
  • Inability to move
  • Shuffling steps, gait

and patients may later develop…

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Memory loss
  • Constipation
  • Decrease ability to smell
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Pneumonia
  • Fractures from falling
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusions
  • Dementia

Who is at Risk for Parkinson’s?

Most cases are idiopathic, meaning the disease arises with no specific cause.  However some cases are genetic and multiple genes have been identified that are associated with the disease.

The average age of onset is 60, but some cases may occur as “early onset”, before the age of 50, and if before the age of 20, it is known as juvenile-onset Parkinson’s.

Men appear to be more affected than women at twice the rate.

Risk may be enhanced with a history of head trauma.

Exposure to herbicides and pesticides has been linked to an increase risk of Parkinson’s as well.

 

How Quickly do Parkinson’s Symptoms Progress?

Average progression rates can last years to decades, however, earlier onset disease may manifest much quicker.

The stages of Parkinson’s are illustrated below:

What-Are-the-Stages-of-Parkinson_s-Disease

How is Parkinson’s treated?

Although there is no cure for Parkinson’s, symptoms can be treated by a variety of measures.

  • Levadopa – converts to dopamine in the brain, helping replace the deficient hormone.
  • Carbidopa (Sinemet) – if given with levadopa prevents the latter from being broken down before it reaches the brain.
  • Dopamine agonists – mimic dopamine
  • MAO-B inhibitors – helps block the enzyme MAO-B, which breaks down natural dopamine
  • Other medications including COMT inhibitors, amantadine and anticholinergics
  • Medications to treat anxiety and depression
  • Deep brain stimulation – a surgeon implants electrodes into the brain, allowing stimulation of parts that help regulate movement.
  • Stem cell therapy – being investigated as a means to create dopamine-producing cells
  • Physical and occupational therapy

 

Famous People Diagnosed with Parkinson’s

  • Michael J. Fox
  • Janet Reno
  • Robin Williams
  • Muhammad Ali
  • Casey Kasem
  • Johnny Cash
  • Linda Ronstadt
  • Pope John Paul II
  • Peanut’s creator Charles Schulz
  • Rev. Jesse Jackson
  • Neil Diamond

It’s been postulated Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinson’s as well.

 

spanish book

Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Beauty, dating, disease, fashion, Health, news, sex

Women Are Digging the Beard….But Only If It’s Clean

Beards are in and ladies will like…..unless they think its dirty and full of “lice.”

A study from the University of Queensland and University of Sterling interviewed 919 heterosexual women and found that they preferred the more masculine looking face (narrow eyes, prominent brow, cut jawline) including a beard, unless they had a personal eversion to ectoparasites such as lice and fleas.  This eversion to critters made them less attracted to a beard.

However those who were less concerned with critters but more concerned with bacteria and viruses, preferred the beard.  Ironic, but in nature hair, such as those in one’s nose, protects one against infectious disease, so instinct may be kicking in.

A Man’s Beard Found to Be Dirtier Than Dog Fur

For those of us who find beards sexy, this study might sway us a tad.

A recent study published in European Radiology found human hair to be dirtier than a dog’s.

Study authors looked at 18 men and 30 dogs and compared the bacterial load in CFUs (colony forming units) from both beards and dog fur.  Then they examined MRI scanners used for both dogs and humans and compared the bacterial load to those only used for humans.

The results were:

OUR STUDY SHOWS A SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER BACTERIAL LOAD IN SPECIMENS TAKEN FROM MEN’S BEARDS COMPARED WITH DOGS’ FUR (P = 0.036). ALL OF THE MEN (18/18) SHOWED HIGH MICROBIAL COUNTS, WHEREAS ONLY 23/30 DOGS HAD HIGH MICROBIAL COUNTS AND 7 DOGS MODERATE MICROBIAL COUNTS. FURTHERMORE, HUMAN-PATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS WERE MORE FREQUENTLY FOUND IN HUMAN BEARDS (7/18) THAN IN DOG FUR (4/30), ALTHOUGH THIS DIFFERENCE DID NOT REACH STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE (P = 0.074). MORE MICROBES WERE FOUND IN HUMAN ORAL CAVITIES THAN IN DOG ORAL CAVITIES (P < 0.001). AFTER MRI OF DOGS, ROUTINE SCANNER DISINFECTION WAS UNDERTAKEN AND THE CFU FOUND IN SPECIMENS ISOLATED FROM THE MRI SCANNING TABLE AND RECEIVER COILS SHOWED SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER BACTERIA COUNT COMPARED WITH “HUMAN” MRI SCANNERS (P < 0.05).
Hence bearded men harbor “significantly higher burden of microbes and more human-pathogenic strains than dogs.”

Last year, researchers out of Manchester University found 47% of beards tested contained fecal matter that contained deadly pathogens.

This study was also coauthored by Fragrance Direct, and found despite cleaning habits of study participants, enterococcus was found on 47% of beards swabbed and cultured.

Enterococcus is a bacteria commonly found in the colon and feces and has over 17 types, the most common being E. faecalis and E. faecium. These may cause infections in the urinary tract, abdomen, pelvis, wound and even blood (sepsis).

 

enterococcus-faecalis-bacteria-br-image-credit-janice-haney-carr-cdc-pete-wardell-br.png

This study followed one done in 2015 by Quest Diagnostics in New Mexico, in which a microbiologist swabbed beards and grew out cultures finding bacteria that commonly colonize our colon.

Bacteria like to hide on the skin but need cover, and beard hair offers a nice warm, moist shelter.  Oral sex increases one’s chance of being “contaminated” with pelvic and rectal bacteria.

A spokesman for Fragrance Direct states, “Caring for your beard is essential for its health, helping it stay fresh to keep the bacteria at bay.  Everyone knows to shampoo their hair, but beards need some attention too. Men should use beard shampoo when they shower, along with conditioner afterwards.”

So the next time you run your fingers through a man’s beard, sanitize them afterwards….

 

IMG_1781

The Baby Boomer’s Guide to Online Dating

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Beauty, disease, Health, news, sex

Bigger the Breasts? Bigger the Cold…..

For those of us who think big-breasted women are lucky, think again.  A study published in Archives of Sexual Behavior finds those with larger breasts may suffer a cold longer than those who are smaller cupped.

Authors looked at 163 young, non-pregnant, non-lactating, Caucasian Polish female students, and after an extensive study design with surveys, hormone levels and measurements concluded that larger breast size correlated negatively with respiratory health, “breast size was positively related to respiratory infections and two of its components, average duration of illness and frequency of antibiotic use (Table 1, Fig. 2), indicating that women with larger breasts experienced longer episodes of respiratory diseases and took antibiotics more frequently.”

This mirrored previous studies linking large breast size to diabetes and breast cancer.

One would think that large breasts would put a little more distance between others but that didn’t seem to correlate.  Some hypothesize that the fat stores decrease one’s immunity and can increase antibiotic resistance.  And some believe the breasts provide a trampoline for pathogens to bounce from.

Should Large-Breasted Women have a Reduction to Protect their Health?

Moreover, us large breasted women are always distracted but activities such as straightening our bra straps, covering up when we bend forward, and losing our keys.  It’s difficult to wash your hands thoroughly in the sink when you can’t see them.

Hence, women like myself can overcome this handicap by storing hand sanitizer in our bras.

What is the average breast size in the US?

#Shirtsoff

 

According to babeappeal.com, the average size is 34 DD.  They also list on their site, how countries differ in breast size:

Average cup size in Australia: D
Average cup size in Brazil: B
Average cup size in Canada: DD
Average cup size in France: A
Average cup size in Germany: D
Average cup size in Ireland: D
Average cup size in Italy: A
Average cup size in Japan: A
Average cup size in Mexico: B
Average cup size in New Zealand: D
Average cup size in Russia: B
Average cup size in Singapore: < A
Average cup size in Spain: C
Average cup size in UK: D
Average cup size in USA (Caucasian): > DDD
Average cup size in USA (non-Caucasian): DD

Why Do Breasts Droop Over Time?

As obesity and BMI’s rise, so can cup sizes as well as certain health risks. Bigger does not always mean better…..

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in cell phones, disease, economy, Education, Health, Millennials, New Year's, news, Politics, pornography, relationships, seniors, teachers, teens

The Twenties: Predictions for the Next Decade

 

Image above from MHLNews

 

Welcome to the 2020’s!!  Whereas the 1920’s were roaring with music, fashion, cars, speak-easy’s, and prohibition, the 2020’s will be no less dramatic.  Expect a high speed roller coaster with exponential changes across the board in all industries, jobs, housing, schooling, technology and relationships. Whether we like it or not, this is where I believe we’re heading……

  1.  Education – most schools will be online, similar to Ready Player One in which a student logs in from home and enters a “virtual classroom” each morning. Afternoons will be designated for sports, exercise and team projects.
  2. Teacher glut – As schools move more towards online, one teacher can teach to multiple virtual classrooms at the same time.  Chat rooms will be staffed by educators who will answer student’s questions individually.  But teacher to student ratio can be widened, allowing school districts to hire less staff.
  3. Half of all US employees will be working from home.
  4. Commercial real estate glut – as more businesses use online platforms, and employees work from home, less office space will be needed, trimming bottom lines for corporations who don’t want to spend extra for rent, cleaning, utilities and security.
  5. Recession will begin mid-decade
  6. Trump will be reelected in 2020 but Pence will fail to win the Presidency in 2024 resulting in the White House turning Democrat mid decade.
  7. A female President or Vice President will elected
  8. Men’s and Women’s restrooms will be renamed as “Restrooms” allowing any gender to use the facilities
  9. Medicine will become socialized as a Democratic executive branch will implement a public option or buy-in to Medicare/Medicaid, with tight rules to curb healthcare spending.
  10. Telemedicine will be your primary care provider with allowances to see a doctor in person if certain criteria are met.
  11. Drones will be delivering medicine, packages, mail to your door
  12. Anorexia and other eating disorders will rise as “intermittent fasting” becomes more popular
  13. New superbugs, viruses and fungi will be resistant to the best of our medications and non antibiotic/viral/fungal treatments will be perfected.
  14. Less than 1/4 of Generation Z’ers (those born after 2000) will choose to get married
  15. Less than 1/4 of Generation Z’ers will have a car
  16. Apartment and condo living will surpass single family residence homes as there is less upkeep and commitment during a trying economy.
  17. The 4-year college degree will be offered for free, but online and useless due to its ubiquity
  18. Virtual TV show watching, where you can  engage within the scene, will surpass current streaming of shows in popularity
  19. Currency will be obsolete as cards and finger prints will be used for money exchange
  20. Kiosks will replace most salespeople in retail industry
  21. A younger “teen” porn industry will arise as kids outsmart parental controls and demand footage devoid of middle-aged actors but casting those in their young twenties….with companies marketing directly to young adults.
  22. Some seniors may live to 125-130 years old
  23. Marijuana use will become epidemic with people becoming tolerant to common strains resulting in needing more potent leaves.
  24. Vegetarian and Vegan diets will surpass meat and potato saturated meals
  25. “Farting rooms” will be created in buildings to allow those who are eating more vegetables to release their gas.
  26. Smart toilets and do it yourself testing will be in every household
  27. The Supreme Court will weigh in on mandatory vaccines
  28. Baby Yoda will have a Star Wars Movie Series
  29. Radio will be stronger than ever as people want to hear real opinions
  30. TV News programs will begin to fall as demand for non-opinionated factual news rises
  31. The Dallas Cowboys will make it to the Superbowl at least once; the Kansas City Chiefs…multiple times.

I know some of these sound crazy but this is where society is heading.  The 2020’s will be fast paced, and blow right by you, so hold on to your hats….which by the way will also be making a comeback.

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

Posted in disease, earthquake, Health, news, nuclear

Plutonium “Smuggled” Into Site Near Las Vegas…..What Are The Health Impacts?

News of trucks bringing weapons-grade plutonium into Southern Nevada earlier this year drew a glitz of gasps from Las Vegas residents and legislators who knew nothing of the shipments.

The radioactive material came from South Carolina and was authorized by the Department of Energy to be stored at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) 65 miles (per its site) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

 

About_Rotating_1.jpg

 

Legal attempts to remove the plutonium and stop future shipments have met with resistance as the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 allows the US government to control the development, regulation, and disposal of nuclear materials and facilities in the United States (Wikipedia).

Plutonium is a man-made radioactive element created by the destruction of uranium, a naturally occurring radioactive element. Both have been used as fuel sources and to make nuclear weapons.

pu-238ball

Plutonium is known as an “unstable” element, in that it will decay until it eventually reduces to a stable element. During this decay, radiation is emitted.  The radiation particles (specifically alpha and beta) will usually not penetrate the skin, however if ingested, absorbed or inhaled, could enter the human body and deposit in organs, affecting nearby tissues. Since its half-life, or rate of decay, can take years, organs in the body, such as lungs, liver, and bones can be exposed chronically to the radiation. This may result in radiation illness, cancer or death.

Signs of radiation illness include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Sores/skin burns
  • Frequent infections
  • Diarrhea
  • Hair loss
  • Weakness
  • Internal Bleeding
  • and more….

Currently there have been no reports of illness due to its storage in Nevada and the US government has assured the state that the storage facility is safe. However, potential seismic activity or an act of terrorism could lead to a potential leak and/or contamination, and with the infamous desert winds, radioactive material could be blown to nearby towns and inhaled or ingested by residents.

Per the NNSS site:

The DAF (Device Assembly Facility) is a collection of more than 30 individual steel-reinforced concrete buildings connected by a rectangular common corridor. The entire complex, covered by compacted earth, spans an area of 100,000 square feet.
Safety systems include fire detection and suppression, electrical grounding, independent heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems with high-efficiency particulate air filters, alarm systems, and warning lights. In operational areas, pairs of blast doors, designed to mitigate the effects of an explosion, are interlocked so that only one door may open at a time.

And some reports say the plutonium may be shipped out of state to nearby facilities and not remain in Nevada.

I won’t hold my breath….oh wait…maybe I should…..

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in disease, flu, Health, news

This Year’s Flu Season Has Begun

Although flu season officially starts in October, public health officials in Riverside, California have already reported the first “flu-related” death this year, a 4 year-old child.

And being that Australia’s flu season began a couple weeks early and was more “severe” than previous years, US health experts are bracing for a rough one of our own.

We still, however, cannot predict how “severe” this year’s flu season will be, but here are answers to the most commonly asked questions about the flu.

When does flu season begin and how long does it last?

Flu season has begun already. It typically starts in the Fall, and ends late Spring.  So the range is described as October to May with it peaking December to March.

How bad will this flu season be?

It is difficult to predict, but already this early in the season we’ve had a flu-related death.  As the season unfolds, more cases will be reported by the CDC’s Flu View.

What is the flu?  How can one die from it?

The flu is caused by a virus. Multiple strains of virus’ can cause the flu.  The virus itself can be lethal, however the greatest risk comes with what it does to your immune system, thereby putting one at risk of secondary infections.  Pneumonia is the number one cause of flu-related deaths.  Secondly, it can exacerbate existing conditions such as asthma, seizures, even promote preterm birth, hence those who are pregnant or have preexisting medical conditions are urged to get vaccinated against the flu.  Moreover those who qualify should get the pneumonia vaccine as well.

 

h1n1-swine-flu-virus
h1n1 virus

 

What does this year’s flu vaccine cover?

According to the CDC, the trivalent vaccine covers for these three strains of flu virus:

  •  A/Brisbane/02/2018 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • A/Kansas/14/2017 (H3N2)-like virus
  • B/Colorado/06/2017-like (Victoria lineage) virus

Quadrivalent influenza vaccines will contain these three viruses and an additional influenza B vaccine virus, a B/Phuket/3073/2013–like virus (Yamagata lineage).

These vaccines are aimed at providing protection against the Swine flu, and some influenza A and B strains.

What about older individuals?

This year, those over 65 will have three options for their flu vaccine.

Fluzone High-Dose – a higher dose flu vaccine that will hopefully allow their immunity to protect against the flu longer

FLUAD – the trivalent flu vaccine with an adjuvant to stimulate more of an immune response.

Flublock Quadrivalent – provides protection against 4 strains.

What about the nasal spray vaccine?

This year, the CDC allows use of the nasal spray vaccine as it has shown to have improved efficacy from  prior years. However it is only recommended for  those who are between the ages of 2 and 49 and cannot be given to those who are pregnancy or who have compromising medical conditions as outlined by the CDC.

Who should get the flu shot?

All individuals 6 months old and older unless specified by their medical provider.

How long does it take the flu shot to “kick in”?

The average immune system takes a couple weeks of to prime, so we suggest getting the flu shot before the season starts…or peaks.  However, experts recommend to still get the flu vaccine to anyone who missed early vaccination.

What if I’m allergic to eggs?

Most individuals allergic to eggs can still get the flu vaccine, but if the allergy to eggs is severe (anaphylaxis, angioedema, difficulty breathing), the CDC recommends notifying your medical provider and being in a facility to monitor you if you do get the flu vaccine.

Will I get the flu from the flu shot?

No.  The flu vaccine has a “killed” version of the virus meaning it’s not an active virus (as opposed to a live attenuated vaccine, a weakened down version of it).   A “killed” or “inactivated” vaccine merely has the pathogen particles to induce an immune response.  Additionally, when one states they got the flu despite the flu shot it could be that the flu shot only protects against 3 – 4 strains and they were infected with a more rare strain not covered by the vaccine.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

The average effectiveness each year hovers around 60%.  Last year’s efficacy was much lower and this year’s has not been predicted as of yet. Australia is still reporting active cases on their Department of Health website.

I feel sick after the flu shot, why?

For some, the immune response that ensues can make one feel mildly ill, but should not resemble the flu. Those who state they got the flu “immediately” after receiving the shot, might have already been exposed and had not had a chance to produce immunity prior to their exposure.

sneezing

 

What are symptoms of the flu? How is it different from a cold?

A cold comes on slower and less severe.  Flu symptoms are more abrupt and can include:

  • Fever
  • Body Aches
  • Cough
  • Sneezing
  • Sore Throat
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Are there medications to treat the flu? Will antibiotics work?

There are antiviral medications available, such as Tamiflu, to treat the flu.  Antibiotics, however, will not work since the flu is not caused by a bacteria but rather a virus. However if a secondary bacterial infection takes over, antibiotics may be used.

How can I prevent getting the flu?

Besides vaccination, avoid being around those who are sick, thorough hand washing, and take good care of yourself.  A balanced diet, exercise and sleep regimen can help boost your immune system.

Wishing you health this season!!

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in disease, Health, news

West Nile Virus Cases in Humans Reported in Multiple States including Nevada

 

Multiple cases of West Nile virus has been confirmed in Clark County, Nevada. The Southern Nevada Health District has declared an “outbreak of mosquito-borne diseases” following new cases of the virus being reported earlier this month.

This summer has been a wetter season in the Southwest, most likely causing an uptick in mosquito activity.

States throughout the country have been reporting cases of West Nile virus as well, with the highest occurring in Arizona (42 cases as of 7/23/19 per CDC).

 

wnv-activity-07092019.jpg

 

West Nile Virus Disease Cases* and Presumptive Viremic Blood Donors by State – United States, 2019 (as of July 23, 2019)

West Nile Virus Disease Cases and Presumptive Viremic Blood Donors by State – United States, 2018 (as of November 27, 2018)
State Neuroinvasive
Disease Cases†
Non–neuroinvasive
Disease Cases
Total
cases
Deaths Presumptive viremic
blood donors‡
Arizona 42 15 57 1 16
Arkansas 1 0 1 1 0
California 2 0 2 1 1
Colorado 0 1 1 0 0
Iowa 0 2 2 0 0
Kentucky 1 0 1 0 0
Maryland 0 1 1 0 0
Missouri 1 0 1 0 0
Nebraska 1 0 1 1 0
Nevada 1 0 1 0 0
New Jersey 1 0 1 0 0
North Dakota 1 0 1 0 0
Oklahoma 1 2 3 0 0
South Dakota 0 1 1 0 0
Virginia 0 1 1 0 0
Wyoming 1 0 1 0 0
Totals 53 23 76 4 17
*Includes confirmed and probable cases.
†Includes cases reported as meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis.
‡Presumptive viremic blood donors (PVDs) are people who had no symptoms at the time of donating blood through a blood collection agency, but whose blood tested positive when screened for the presence of West Nile virus. Some PVDs develop symptoms after donation.
Please refer to state health department web sites for further details regarding state case totals.

What is West Nile virus?

West Nile virus was originally discovered in the 1930’s in the West Nile district of Uganda.  It is believed to have reached the United States in the late 1990’s.

It’s in the family of Flaviviridae in which the disease is vector transmitted, such as by ticks, or mosquitoes, and can infect mammals as hosts. West Nile is in the same family as Zika, Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, and Japanese Encephalitis.

Culex genus/species of mosquitoes are the usual culprit.  They feed from evening to morning, hence are more active during those times.

How is West Nile transmitted?

A mosquito contracts the disease while feeding on an infected bird and then can transmit it to humans.

WNV-transmission-cycle.jpg

What are the symptoms of West Nile virus infections?

80% of those infected do not exhibit symptoms.  Some however, may elicit the following if they have mild illness:

  • Fever
  • Body aches
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Joint  pains
  • Weakness
  • Rash

Diffuse-maculopapular-rash-associated-with-West-Nile-virus-infection.png

Image from Reserachgate

Rarely (1 in 150 people) may become seriously ill with neuroinvasive symptoms.  These include:

  • Headache
  • Neck pain/Stiff neck
  • High fever
  • Sensitivity to the light (photophobia)
  • Tremors
  • Weakness
  • Paralysis
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

Since mosquitoes are the primary vector, avoiding them is paramount to limiting infection.  We recommend the following:

Clean up areas of standing water around the house such as kiddie pools, puddles, buckets as they provide a breeding ground for mosquitoes.

Wear light long sleeve clothing, pants tucked into socks/shoes when outside.

Use DEET or insect repellent that can also be sprayed onto clothes when planning to be outdoors.

Be aware that many mosquitoes are active from dusk till dawn.

If bit by a mosquito, contact your local medical provider if you have any of the aforementioned symptoms.

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.