Posted in Health, Hurricane, news, weather

Hurricane Season Appears to Be Here…. and Early

The first storm of the season is beginning to form in the Atlantic….2 weeks early. The National Hurricane Center reports a storm forming off the coast of Florida and could be this season’s first named storm.key_messages

 

June 1st marks the official start of Hurricane season and it runs until November 30th.  September is usually the most active month.  Hurricanes are categorized by their wind speed as designated as the following using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale:

  • Category I have sustained winds of 74 to 95 mph
  • Category II have sustained winds of 96 to 110 mph
  • Category III have sustained winds of 111 to 129 mph
  • Category IV have sustained winds of 130 to 156 mph
  • Category V have sustained  winds of over 157 mph

hurricane-categories2.jpg

Category III storms have known to cause “devastating” damage and Categories IV and V have been associated with “catastrophic” damage.

In a given year, the Atlantic Ocean averages 12 named storms with 6 becoming “hurricanes” and 3 becoming “major” meaning a Category III or greater.

According to Dr. Dan Kottlowksi, veteran meteorologist, this season may have 14 to 18 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 7 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher).

accuweather.png

Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was at one point a Category V but when it hit landfall it was a Category 3, tragically killing over 1800 people and causing $108 billion in damage.  The deadliest hurricane to ever hit US soil, however, was the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 in which over 10,000 people died.

Any given hurricane season may be dependent on “El Nino” and water temperatures.

El Nino is refers to a ocean-atmospheric interaction where sea surface temperatures rise near the equatorial Pacific, causing increase wind shear in the Atlantic equatorial region and has been linked to lower than active hurricane seasons.  However warmer water temperatures in the Atlantic and Caribbean as well as monsoon activity in Africa could increase hurricane activity.

So an El Nino hurricane season may offer some protection but can be easily offset by ocean water temperatures.  2020 may not be an El Nino hurricane season and subsequently see more activity in the Atlantic.

Dr. Kottlowski states, “This year, more than likely, we’ll get hit with one or two big storms and we don’t know specifically where that is, so if you live near a coast or on an island, have a hurricane plan in place.”

This year’s names for the 2020 Hurricane Season are the following

Atlantic

Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

 

Pacific

Amanda
Boris
Cristina
Douglas
Elida
Fausto
Genevieve
Hernan
Iselle
Julio
Karina
Lowell
Marie
Norbert
Odalys
Polo
Rachel
Simon
Trudy
Vance
Winnie
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke

 

Hurricane Kate 300px.jpg

How to prepare for the hurricane season

Preparation means starting early.

Make sure you keep informed of the latest alerts and official recommendations.

Evacuate when told to do so by city officials.

Many people will try to tough it out and unfortunately get walled up in their homes.  So make sure you have adequate water (1 gallon per day/person for at least three days) and 1/4 – 1/2 gallon/water/ per pet, except the fish obviously.

Canned foods, flashlights, medical supply kit, batteries, blankets, cash, medications in water proof containers should be set aside for disasters, and put important papers in waterproof/fireproof casings.

According to ready.gov, they recommend the following:

 

PREPARE NOW
  • KNOW YOUR AREA’S RISK OF HURRICANES.
  • SIGN UP FOR YOUR COMMUNITY’S WARNING SYSTEM. THE EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) AND NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION (NOAA) WEATHER RADIO ALSO PROVIDE EMERGENCY ALERTS.
  • IF YOU ARE AT RISK FOR FLASH FLOODING, WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS SUCH AS HEAVY RAIN.
  • PRACTICE GOING TO A SAFE SHELTER FOR HIGH WINDS, SUCH AS A FEMA SAFE ROOM OR ICC 500 STORM SHELTER. THE NEXT BEST PROTECTION IS A SMALL, INTERIOR, WINDOWLESS ROOM IN A STURDY BUILDING ON THE LOWEST LEVEL THAT IS NOT SUBJECT TO FLOODING.
  • BASED ON YOUR LOCATION AND COMMUNITY PLANS, MAKE YOUR OWN PLANS FOR EVACUATION OR SHELTERING IN PLACE.
  • BECOME FAMILIAR WITH YOUR EVACUATION ZONE, THE EVACUATION ROUTE, AND SHELTER LOCATIONS.
  • GATHER NEEDED SUPPLIES FOR AT LEAST THREE DAYS. KEEP IN MIND EACH PERSON’S SPECIFIC NEEDS, INCLUDING MEDICATION. DON’T FORGET THE NEEDS OF PETS.
  • KEEP IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS IN A SAFE PLACE OR CREATE PASSWORD-PROTECTED DIGITAL COPIES.
  • PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. DECLUTTER DRAINS AND GUTTERS. INSTALL CHECK VALVES IN PLUMBING TO PREVENT BACKUPS. CONSIDER HURRICANE SHUTTERS. REVIEW INSURANCE POLICIES.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 36 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • TURN ON YOUR TV OR RADIO IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • RESTOCK YOUR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS KIT. INCLUDE FOOD AND WATER SUFFICIENT FOR AT LEAST THREE DAYS, MEDICATIONS, A FLASHLIGHT, BATTERIES, CASH, AND FIRST AID SUPPLIES.
  • PLAN HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH FAMILY MEMBERS IF YOU LOSE POWER. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU CAN CALL, TEXT, EMAIL OR USE SOCIAL MEDIA. REMEMBER THAT DURING DISASTERS, SENDING TEXT MESSAGES IS USUALLY RELIABLE AND FASTER THAN MAKING PHONE CALLS BECAUSE PHONE LINES ARE OFTEN OVERLOADED.
  • REVIEW YOUR EVACUATION ZONE, EVACUATION ROUTE AND SHELTER LOCATIONS. PLAN WITH YOUR FAMILY. YOU MAY HAVE TO LEAVE QUICKLY SO PLAN AHEAD.
  • KEEP YOUR CAR IN GOOD WORKING CONDITION, AND KEEP THE GAS TANK FULL; STOCK YOUR VEHICLE WITH EMERGENCY SUPPLIES AND A CHANGE OF CLOTHES.
  • IF YOU HAVE NFIP FLOOD INSURANCE, YOUR POLICY MAY COVER UP TO $1000 IN LOSS AVOIDANCE MEASURES, LIKE SANDBAGS AND WATER PUMPS, TO PROTECT YOUR INSURED PROPERTY. YOU SHOULD KEEP COPIES OF ALL RECEIPTS AND A RECORD OF THE TIME SPENT PERFORMING THE WORK. THEY SHOULD BE SUBMITTED TO YOUR INSURANCE ADJUSTER WHEN YOU FILE A CLAIM TO BE REIMBURSED. VISIT WWW.FEMA.GOV/MEDIA-LIBRARY/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/137860 TO LEARN MORE.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 18-36 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • BOOKMARK YOUR CITY OR COUNTY WEBSITE FOR QUICK ACCESS TO STORM UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • BRING LOOSE, LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS INSIDE THAT COULD BECOME PROJECTILES IN HIGH WINDS (E.G., PATIO FURNITURE, GARBAGE CANS); ANCHOR OBJECTS THAT WOULD BE UNSAFE TO BRING INSIDE (E.G., PROPANE TANKS); AND TRIM OR REMOVE TREES CLOSE ENOUGH TO FALL ON THE BUILDING.
  • COVER ALL OF YOUR HOME’S WINDOWS. PERMANENT STORM SHUTTERS OFFER THE BEST PROTECTION FOR WINDOWS. A SECOND OPTION IS TO BOARD UP WINDOWS WITH 5/8” EXTERIOR GRADE OR MARINE PLYWOOD, CUT TO FIT AND READY TO INSTALL.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 6-18 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • TURN ON YOUR TV/RADIO, OR CHECK YOUR CITY/COUNTY WEBSITE EVERY 30 MINUTES IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONE NOW SO YOU WILL HAVE A FULL BATTERY IN CASE YOU LOSE POWER.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 6 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • IF YOU’RE NOT IN AN AREA THAT IS RECOMMENDED FOR EVACUATION, PLAN TO STAY AT HOME OR WHERE YOU ARE AND LET FRIENDS AND FAMILY KNOW WHERE YOU ARE.
  • CLOSE STORM SHUTTERS, AND STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. FLYING GLASS FROM BROKEN WINDOWS COULD INJURE YOU.
  • TURN YOUR REFRIGERATOR OR FREEZER TO THE COLDEST SETTING AND OPEN ONLY WHEN NECESSARY. IF YOU LOSE POWER, FOOD WILL LAST LONGER. KEEP A THERMOMETER IN THE REFRIGERATOR TO BE ABLE TO CHECK THE FOOD TEMPERATURE WHEN THE POWER IS RESTORED.
  • TURN ON YOUR TV/RADIO, OR CHECK YOUR CITY/COUNTY WEBSITE EVERY 30 MINUTES IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
SURVIVE DURING
  • IF TOLD TO EVACUATE, DO SO IMMEDIATELY. DO NOT DRIVE AROUND BARRICADES.
  • IF SHELTERING DURING HIGH WINDS, GO TO A FEMA SAFE ROOM, ICC 500 STORM SHELTER, OR A SMALL, INTERIOR, WINDOWLESS ROOM OR HALLWAY ON THE LOWEST FLOOR THAT IS NOT SUBJECT TO FLOODING.
  • IF TRAPPED IN A BUILDING BY FLOODING, GO TO THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. DO NOT CLIMB INTO A CLOSED ATTIC. YOU MAY BECOME TRAPPED BY RISING FLOOD WATER.
  • LISTEN FOR CURRENT EMERGENCY INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS.
  • USE A GENERATOR OR OTHER GASOLINE-POWERED MACHINERY OUTDOORS ONLY AND AWAY FROM WINDOWS.
  • DO NOT WALK, SWIM, OR DRIVE THROUGH FLOOD WATERS. TURN AROUND. DON’T DROWN! JUST SIX INCHES OF FAST-MOVING WATER CAN KNOCK YOU DOWN, AND ONE FOOT OF MOVING WATER CAN SWEEP YOUR VEHICLE AWAY.
  • STAY OFF OF BRIDGES OVER FAST-MOVING WATER.
BE SAFE AFTER
  • LISTEN TO AUTHORITIES FOR INFORMATION AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS.
  • BE CAREFUL DURING CLEAN-UP. WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND WORK WITH SOMEONE ELSE.
  • DO NOT TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT IF IT IS WET OR IF YOU ARE STANDING IN WATER. IF IT IS SAFE TO DO SO, TURN OFF ELECTRICITY AT THE MAIN BREAKER OR FUSE BOX TO PREVENT ELECTRIC SHOCK.
  • AVOID WADING IN FLOOD WATER, WHICH CAN CONTAIN DANGEROUS DEBRIS. UNDERGROUND OR DOWNED POWER LINES CAN ALSO ELECTRICALLY CHARGE THE WATER.
  • SAVE PHONE CALLS FOR EMERGENCIES. PHONE SYSTEMS ARE OFTEN DOWN OR BUSY AFTER A DISASTER. USE TEXT MESSAGES OR SOCIAL MEDIA TO COMMUNICATE WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS.
  • DOCUMENT ANY PROPERTY DAMAGE WITH PHOTOGRAPHS. CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY FOR ASSISTANCE.

Always have an emergency plan, practice it with family members, discuss with distantly located relatives how you will notify each other of your safety, and stay tuned to your radio, TV, wireless emergency alerts encase evacuations are ordered.

 

spanish book

Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, Hurricane, news, weather

This Year’s Hurricane Predictions

This year AccuWeather meteorologists predict an above-normal hurricane season.

According to Dr. Dan Kottlowksi, veteran meteorologist, this season may have 14 to 18 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 7 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher).

accuweather.png

 

June 1st marks the official start of Hurricane season and it runs until November 30th.  September is usually the most active month.  Hurricanes are categorized by their wind speed as designated as the following using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale:

  • Category I have sustained winds of 74 to 95 mph
  • Category II have sustained winds of 96 to 110 mph
  • Category III have sustained winds of 111 to 129 mph
  • Category IV have sustained winds of 130 to 156 mph
  • Category V have sustained  winds of over 157 mph

hurricane-categories2.jpg

Category III storms have known to cause “devastating” damage and Categories IV and V have been associated with “catastrophic” damage.

In a given year, the Atlantic Ocean averages 12 named storms with 6 becoming “hurricanes” and 3 becoming “major” meaning a Category III or greater.

Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was at one point a Category V but when it hit landfall it was a Category 3, tragically killing over 1800 people and causing $108 billion in damage.  The deadliest hurricane to ever hit US soil, however, was the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 in which over 10,000 people died.

Any given hurricane season may be dependent on “El Nino” and water temperatures.

El Nino is refers to a ocean-atmospheric interaction where sea surface temperatures rise near the equatorial Pacific, causing increase wind shear in the Atlantic equatorial region and has been linked to lower than active hurricane seasons.  However warmer water temperatures in the Atlantic and Caribbean as well as monsoon activity in Africa could increase hurricane activity.

So an El Nino hurricane season may offer some protection but can be easily offset by ocean water temperatures.  2020 may not be an El Nino hurricane season and subsequently see more activity in the Atlantic.

Dr. Kottlowski states, “This year, more than likely, we’ll get hit with one or two big storms and we don’t know specifically where that is, so if you live near a coast or on an island, have a hurricane plan in place.”

This year’s names for the 2020 Hurricane Season are the following

Atlantic

Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

 

Pacific

Amanda
Boris
Cristina
Douglas
Elida
Fausto
Genevieve
Hernan
Iselle
Julio
Karina
Lowell
Marie
Norbert
Odalys
Polo
Rachel
Simon
Trudy
Vance
Winnie
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke

 

Hurricane Kate 300px.jpg

How to prepare for the hurricane season

Preparation means starting early.

Make sure you keep informed of the latest alerts and official recommendations.

Evacuate when told to do so by city officials.

Many people will try to tough it out and unfortunately get walled up in their homes.  So make sure you have adequate water (1 gallon per day/person for at least three days) and 1/4 – 1/2 gallon/water/ per pet, except the fish obviously.

Canned foods, flashlights, medical supply kit, batteries, blankets, cash, medications in water proof containers should be set aside for disasters, and put important papers in waterproof/fireproof casings.

According to ready.gov, they recommend the following:

 

PREPARE NOW
  • KNOW YOUR AREA’S RISK OF HURRICANES.
  • SIGN UP FOR YOUR COMMUNITY’S WARNING SYSTEM. THE EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) AND NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION (NOAA) WEATHER RADIO ALSO PROVIDE EMERGENCY ALERTS.
  • IF YOU ARE AT RISK FOR FLASH FLOODING, WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS SUCH AS HEAVY RAIN.
  • PRACTICE GOING TO A SAFE SHELTER FOR HIGH WINDS, SUCH AS A FEMA SAFE ROOM OR ICC 500 STORM SHELTER. THE NEXT BEST PROTECTION IS A SMALL, INTERIOR, WINDOWLESS ROOM IN A STURDY BUILDING ON THE LOWEST LEVEL THAT IS NOT SUBJECT TO FLOODING.
  • BASED ON YOUR LOCATION AND COMMUNITY PLANS, MAKE YOUR OWN PLANS FOR EVACUATION OR SHELTERING IN PLACE.
  • BECOME FAMILIAR WITH YOUR EVACUATION ZONE, THE EVACUATION ROUTE, AND SHELTER LOCATIONS.
  • GATHER NEEDED SUPPLIES FOR AT LEAST THREE DAYS. KEEP IN MIND EACH PERSON’S SPECIFIC NEEDS, INCLUDING MEDICATION. DON’T FORGET THE NEEDS OF PETS.
  • KEEP IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS IN A SAFE PLACE OR CREATE PASSWORD-PROTECTED DIGITAL COPIES.
  • PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. DECLUTTER DRAINS AND GUTTERS. INSTALL CHECK VALVES IN PLUMBING TO PREVENT BACKUPS. CONSIDER HURRICANE SHUTTERS. REVIEW INSURANCE POLICIES.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 36 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • TURN ON YOUR TV OR RADIO IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • RESTOCK YOUR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS KIT. INCLUDE FOOD AND WATER SUFFICIENT FOR AT LEAST THREE DAYS, MEDICATIONS, A FLASHLIGHT, BATTERIES, CASH, AND FIRST AID SUPPLIES.
  • PLAN HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH FAMILY MEMBERS IF YOU LOSE POWER. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU CAN CALL, TEXT, EMAIL OR USE SOCIAL MEDIA. REMEMBER THAT DURING DISASTERS, SENDING TEXT MESSAGES IS USUALLY RELIABLE AND FASTER THAN MAKING PHONE CALLS BECAUSE PHONE LINES ARE OFTEN OVERLOADED.
  • REVIEW YOUR EVACUATION ZONE, EVACUATION ROUTE AND SHELTER LOCATIONS. PLAN WITH YOUR FAMILY. YOU MAY HAVE TO LEAVE QUICKLY SO PLAN AHEAD.
  • KEEP YOUR CAR IN GOOD WORKING CONDITION, AND KEEP THE GAS TANK FULL; STOCK YOUR VEHICLE WITH EMERGENCY SUPPLIES AND A CHANGE OF CLOTHES.
  • IF YOU HAVE NFIP FLOOD INSURANCE, YOUR POLICY MAY COVER UP TO $1000 IN LOSS AVOIDANCE MEASURES, LIKE SANDBAGS AND WATER PUMPS, TO PROTECT YOUR INSURED PROPERTY. YOU SHOULD KEEP COPIES OF ALL RECEIPTS AND A RECORD OF THE TIME SPENT PERFORMING THE WORK. THEY SHOULD BE SUBMITTED TO YOUR INSURANCE ADJUSTER WHEN YOU FILE A CLAIM TO BE REIMBURSED. VISIT WWW.FEMA.GOV/MEDIA-LIBRARY/ASSETS/DOCUMENTS/137860 TO LEARN MORE.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 18-36 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • BOOKMARK YOUR CITY OR COUNTY WEBSITE FOR QUICK ACCESS TO STORM UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • BRING LOOSE, LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS INSIDE THAT COULD BECOME PROJECTILES IN HIGH WINDS (E.G., PATIO FURNITURE, GARBAGE CANS); ANCHOR OBJECTS THAT WOULD BE UNSAFE TO BRING INSIDE (E.G., PROPANE TANKS); AND TRIM OR REMOVE TREES CLOSE ENOUGH TO FALL ON THE BUILDING.
  • COVER ALL OF YOUR HOME’S WINDOWS. PERMANENT STORM SHUTTERS OFFER THE BEST PROTECTION FOR WINDOWS. A SECOND OPTION IS TO BOARD UP WINDOWS WITH 5/8” EXTERIOR GRADE OR MARINE PLYWOOD, CUT TO FIT AND READY TO INSTALL.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 6-18 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • TURN ON YOUR TV/RADIO, OR CHECK YOUR CITY/COUNTY WEBSITE EVERY 30 MINUTES IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
  • CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONE NOW SO YOU WILL HAVE A FULL BATTERY IN CASE YOU LOSE POWER.
WHEN A HURRICANE IS 6 HOURS FROM ARRIVING
  • IF YOU’RE NOT IN AN AREA THAT IS RECOMMENDED FOR EVACUATION, PLAN TO STAY AT HOME OR WHERE YOU ARE AND LET FRIENDS AND FAMILY KNOW WHERE YOU ARE.
  • CLOSE STORM SHUTTERS, AND STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. FLYING GLASS FROM BROKEN WINDOWS COULD INJURE YOU.
  • TURN YOUR REFRIGERATOR OR FREEZER TO THE COLDEST SETTING AND OPEN ONLY WHEN NECESSARY. IF YOU LOSE POWER, FOOD WILL LAST LONGER. KEEP A THERMOMETER IN THE REFRIGERATOR TO BE ABLE TO CHECK THE FOOD TEMPERATURE WHEN THE POWER IS RESTORED.
  • TURN ON YOUR TV/RADIO, OR CHECK YOUR CITY/COUNTY WEBSITE EVERY 30 MINUTES IN ORDER TO GET THE LATEST WEATHER UPDATES AND EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS.
SURVIVE DURING
  • IF TOLD TO EVACUATE, DO SO IMMEDIATELY. DO NOT DRIVE AROUND BARRICADES.
  • IF SHELTERING DURING HIGH WINDS, GO TO A FEMA SAFE ROOM, ICC 500 STORM SHELTER, OR A SMALL, INTERIOR, WINDOWLESS ROOM OR HALLWAY ON THE LOWEST FLOOR THAT IS NOT SUBJECT TO FLOODING.
  • IF TRAPPED IN A BUILDING BY FLOODING, GO TO THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. DO NOT CLIMB INTO A CLOSED ATTIC. YOU MAY BECOME TRAPPED BY RISING FLOOD WATER.
  • LISTEN FOR CURRENT EMERGENCY INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS.
  • USE A GENERATOR OR OTHER GASOLINE-POWERED MACHINERY OUTDOORS ONLY AND AWAY FROM WINDOWS.
  • DO NOT WALK, SWIM, OR DRIVE THROUGH FLOOD WATERS. TURN AROUND. DON’T DROWN! JUST SIX INCHES OF FAST-MOVING WATER CAN KNOCK YOU DOWN, AND ONE FOOT OF MOVING WATER CAN SWEEP YOUR VEHICLE AWAY.
  • STAY OFF OF BRIDGES OVER FAST-MOVING WATER.
BE SAFE AFTER
  • LISTEN TO AUTHORITIES FOR INFORMATION AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS.
  • BE CAREFUL DURING CLEAN-UP. WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND WORK WITH SOMEONE ELSE.
  • DO NOT TOUCH ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT IF IT IS WET OR IF YOU ARE STANDING IN WATER. IF IT IS SAFE TO DO SO, TURN OFF ELECTRICITY AT THE MAIN BREAKER OR FUSE BOX TO PREVENT ELECTRIC SHOCK.
  • AVOID WADING IN FLOOD WATER, WHICH CAN CONTAIN DANGEROUS DEBRIS. UNDERGROUND OR DOWNED POWER LINES CAN ALSO ELECTRICALLY CHARGE THE WATER.
  • SAVE PHONE CALLS FOR EMERGENCIES. PHONE SYSTEMS ARE OFTEN DOWN OR BUSY AFTER A DISASTER. USE TEXT MESSAGES OR SOCIAL MEDIA TO COMMUNICATE WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS.
  • DOCUMENT ANY PROPERTY DAMAGE WITH PHOTOGRAPHS. CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY FOR ASSISTANCE.

Always have an emergency plan, practice it with family members, discuss with distantly located relatives how you will notify each other of your safety, and stay tuned to your radio, TV, wireless emergency alerts encase evacuations are ordered.

 

spanish book

Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, Hurricane, news, weather

Hurricane Dorian Devastation: How You Can Help

The Bahamas took a multi-day lashing and SE coastal US is bracing for Dorian’s devastating path.

Torrential tides and downpours are expected to continue and power outages, floods, raging waters, and the potential for tornadoes threaten coastal and inland residents.

Risks of drowning, crush injuries, infection, malnourishment, chemical exposure, hypothermia are just a few of the grave issues residents are facing.

Malnourishment

Many of those who did prepare for the storm may not have stored plenty of food, especially healthy fresh food.  Those trapped in their homes may find the food they did store contaminated by flood water.

 

food-bank-flooded-today-tease-161214_549ce953fa05d997cba48dc74ac69a99.today-inline-large.jpg

GREATER BATON ROUGE FOOD BANK 2016

 

Infectious disease

The World Health Organization states that floods bring water-borne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever, leptospirosis and Hepatitis A.  Vector-borne diseases include Zika, malaria, dengue hemorrhagic fever, yellow fever, and West Nile.

 

Homepage-Mosquito-1024x689

 

Mosquitos initially get washed away during the storm, but the resulting puddles of water take weeks to dry and make ideal breeding grounds for insects.

The water gets dirty pretty quickly.  People touching the flood water need to wash their hands thoroughly before eating or preparing food.

Moreover due to the moisture that seeped into walls and floors of houses, mold can grow and cause a variety of respiratory issues among other physical ailments.  Massive disinfecting needs to take place before coming home to flood water contaminated residencies.

 

toxic-black-mold.jpg

 

Chemical exposure

Chemicals from garages and fuel seeping into flood water expose victims to many compounds such as benzene, toluene and xylene that can cause a multitude of health effects including those that affect breathing, skin, the gut, balance, thought, and memory.

 

Safety

Looters unfortunately take advantage of the situation. During Hurricane Harvey, a Cajun Navy rescuer told CNN that looters fired shots at him and his comrades, trying to take their rescue boat, which had actually broken down.

Panic fuels dangerous behavior and those without resources may try to take from those who prepared.

Sexual assault crimes can rise as predators find the chaos and lack of video surveillance ideal conditions to find victims who can’t yell for help.

 

Psychological

When one loses their home, neighborhood, income, treasured belongings and more, its devastating.  Post-traumatic stress disorder may ensue.

To combat these risks, medical personnel and the CDC are preparing.  Among food, shelter and clothes, paper products, sanitizer, cleaning supplies, tetanus vaccinations and counselors will be needed is mass quantities.

 

How can we help?

Blood supplies will be needed as residents who routinely donate have evacuated the area. Donating blood at your local blood bank may be shipped to the area in need.

Vitalant has locations throughout the country that can accept your blood donation. Contact Vitalant here.

The American Red Cross is accepting monetary and blood donations. Financial donations can be given here or on their website at redcross.org. Moreover one can call 1-800-RED-CROSS or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The Salvation Army is also accepting donations online here and by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (725-2769).

The Red Cross and Salvation Army may also need local volunteers to help set up shelters.  Contact the above numbers.

Army Emergency Relief is taking donations here to help victims of natural disasters.

Save the Children‘s Hurricane Dorian Children’s Relief Fund site can be found here.

Local volunteers are asked to donate places to stay and supplies to nearby recreation centers for housing evacuees.

Supply drives in out-of-state locations may not be accepted directly but could help local charities who need to ship supplies to the affected area.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.