Posted in Health, pets

How to Celebrate Your Pet’s Birthday

Many of us love our pets, treating them as if they were our children.  And for some of us we may love them more (j/k).  So it’s natural to want to celebrate their birthday.

UZ

Here’s some tips on how to make your furry friend feel special on their big day….

For Dogs

  1.  Invite other dogs over. Dogs are very social and love sniffing each other.  It’s their version of “pin the tail on the donkey.”
  2. Go to a dog park.  Less poop in the house
  3. Make them a puppy cake of their favorite meat
  4. Buy them a present but let them unwrap it.  They love the surprise and the suspense. (Un-train them in this feat before Christmas though).
  5. Treat them to a doggie massage

    waiting for my massage
    Image from American Kennel Club
  6. Let them walk YOU on their walk outside
  7. Get a cat piñata and load it with treats
  8. Get them a new pillow bed and don’t yell at them if they poop on it
  9. Treat yourself to a T-bone steak for dinner and give them the bone
  10. If they don’t get to sleep with you on your bed, let them this one time

 

For Cats

 

IMG_6539.jpg

  1. Leave them alone
  2. Let them be
  3. Don’t make eye contact
  4. But in case you have a loving kitty like I do….you can also a order a cat massage or get them a Tweety bird piñata

snappy

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, news

A Man’s Beard Found to Be Dirtier Than Dog Fur

For those of us who find beards sexy, this study might sway us a tad.

A recent study published in European Radiology found human hair to be dirtier than a dog’s.

Study authors looked at 18 men and 30 dogs and compared the bacterial load in CFUs (colony forming units) from both beards and dog fur.  Then they examined MRI scanners used for both dogs and humans and compared the bacterial load to those only used for humans.

The results were:

Our study shows a significantly higher bacterial load in specimens taken from men’s beards compared with dogs’ fur (p = 0.036). All of the men (18/18) showed high microbial counts, whereas only 23/30 dogs had high microbial counts and 7 dogs moderate microbial counts. Furthermore, human-pathogenic microorganisms were more frequently found in human beards (7/18) than in dog fur (4/30), although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.074). More microbes were found in human oral cavities than in dog oral cavities (p < 0.001). After MRI of dogs, routine scanner disinfection was undertaken and the CFU found in specimens isolated from the MRI scanning table and receiver coils showed significantly lower bacteria count compared with “human” MRI scanners (p < 0.05).
Hence bearded men harbor “significantly higher burden of microbes and more human-pathogenic strains than dogs.”

Last summer researchers out of Manchester University found 47% of beards tested contained fecal matter that contained deadly pathogens.

This study was also coauthored by Fragrance Direct, and found despite cleaning habits of study participants, enterococcus was found on 47% of beards swabbed and cultured.

Enterococcus is a bacteria commonly found in the colon and feces and has over 17 types, the most common being E. faecalis and E. faecium. These may cause infections in the urinary tract, abdomen, pelvis, wound and even blood (sepsis).

 

enterococcus-faecalis-bacteria-br-image-credit-janice-haney-carr-cdc-pete-wardell-br.png

This study followed one done in 2015 by Quest Diagnostics in New Mexico, in which a microbiologist swabbed beards and grew out cultures finding bacteria that commonly colonize our colon.

Bacteria like to hide on the skin but need cover, and beard hair offers a nice warm, moist shelter.  Oral sex increases one’s chance of being “contaminated” with pelvic and rectal bacteria.

A spokesman for Fragrance Direct states, “Caring for your beard is essential for its health, helping it stay fresh to keep the bacteria at bay.  Everyone knows to shampoo their hair, but beards need some attention too. Men should use beard shampoo when they shower, along with conditioner afterwards.”

So the next time you run your fingers through a man’s beard, sanitize them afterwards….

 

IMG_1781

The Baby Boomer’s Guide to Online Dating

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

 

Posted in Christmas, food, Health, news, pets, thanksgiving

What Your Pets CANNOT Eat This Holiday Season

ABOVE: SHAKEY-BOO TAKING ADVANTAGE OF DISTRACTED HOSTS

The holidays are coming and so are the in-laws.  So to avoid being outnumbered at the dinner table, we invite our pets.  But can pets eat table scrapings and leftovers from Thanksgiving and Christmas?

Let’s look at what they can and cannot eat.

 

Dogs

UZ.jpg

According to the American Kennel Club, dogs can eat the following (in moderate amounts):

  • Turkey, Chicken, Beef (remove all bones so they don’t get swallowed and perforate the gut)
  • Ham
  • Shrimp
  • Salmon
  • Eggs
  • Cheese
  • Peanut Butter
  • Bread (with no raisins)
  • Popcorn
  • Corn
  • Honey

Avoid the following in dogs:

May be toxic; cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea; electrolyte abnormalities; kidney damage; pancreatitis due to high fat content, or intestinal obstruction

  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Chives
  • Raw Dough
  • Avocado
  • Raisins
  • Grapes
  • Chocolate
  • Cinnamon
  • Ice cream
  • Almonds
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Alcohol
  • Nutmeg
  • Mushrooms
  • Caffeine
  • Coconut
  • Energy drinks
  • Fatty/fried foods and even the fat trimmings
  • Artificial Sweeteners such as Xylitol

And watch their portions. They will eat and eat and eat and won’t keep a tally on what grandma, nephew and the neighbors threw at him.

 

Cats

snappy.jpg

Fluffy or Snappy (above) can eat – but again only in moderation:

  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Grains
  • Vegetables (though many stick their nose up at it)
  • Eggs
  • Butter

IMG_6539.jpg

Avoid similar foods as with dogs due to toxicity and also (according to Vetsnow)

  • Alcohol
  • Raw fish and eggs
  • Dairy products
  • Coffee, tea and energy drinks

 

Fish

fish

Yes, some will bring Nemo to Holiday dinner.

It appears fish can eat many types of meat and vegetables, scrambled eggs and even cooked rice but be careful of toxins, fats and cooking oils.

Parakeet

parakeet

I don’t have any of these and if I did, I doubt I’d share my turkey with it.  But according to pethelpful.com, many fruits, vegetables, breads and nuts (chopped up without shell) can be eaten by birdie.

 

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

Posted in Health, news, pets

Our Pets CAN Tell Time

We pet owners have always suspected it…..our cats jump on us moments before our alarm goes off and our dogs sit by the front door at 5:45 pm each weeknight.   Why? Because they can tell time, well figuratively that is, with science to prove it.

 

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Daniel Dombeck, the associate professor of neurobiology at Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and colleagues, found the part of an animal’s brain that comprised “timing cells” or neurons that would give animals a sense of when something was supposed to happen. In mice this was found to occur in the medial entorhinal cortex of the temporal lobe.

temporal lobe.jpeg

According to news.northwestern.edu:

When planning the study, Dombeck’s team focused on the medial entorhinal cortex, an area located in the brain’s temporal lobe that is associated with memory and navigation. Because that part of the brain encodes spatial information in episodic memories, Dombeck hypothesized that the area could also be responsible for encoding time.
“Every memory is a bit different,” said James Heys, a postdoctoral fellow in Dombeck’s laboratory. “But there are two central features to all episodic memories: space and time. They always happen in a particular environment and are always structured in time.”
To test their hypothesis, Dombeck and Heys set up an experiment called the virtual “door stop” task. In the experiment, a mouse runs on a physical treadmill in a virtual reality environment. The mouse learns to run down a hallway to a door that is located about halfway down the track. After six seconds, the door opens, allowing the mouse to continue down the hallway to receive its reward.
After running several training sessions, researchers made the door invisible in the virtual reality scene. In the new scenario, the mouse still knew where the now-invisible “door” was located based on the floor’s changing textures. And it still waited six seconds at the “door” before abruptly racing down the track to collect its reward.
“The important point here is that the mouse doesn’t know when the door is open or closed because it’s invisible,” said Heys, the paper’s first author. “The only way he can solve this task efficiently is by using his brain’s internal sense of time.”

Our pets’ sense of timing is instinctive and therefore not surprising, as animals have always had the ability to sense the time of day when their prey comes to the water hole or when they to avoid the night prowlers starting their hunt.

So although our humanization of pets may seem cute at first, we should proceed with caution as animals possess many of the same intellectual capabilities as humans.  They’re smart….too smart…..and the more details scientists unlock in their furry heads, the more we learn of how similar they are to us. And I’m not sure I want to know what they’re truly thinking.  Ignorance is bliss…..

 

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dw sketch.jpg

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

 

Posted in Health, news

Doggie Dictionary: 19 Ways Your Dog Speaks

For centuries man has tried to translate the “Ruffs”, “Yowls” and “Gruffs” of man’s best friend to no avail. But researchers at the University of Salford have been able to define 19 of the 47 dog gestures studied in footage by their owners.

These include according to The Sun:

  • Roll over – “Tickle my tummy”
  • Head under – “Get me my toy”
  • Head forward – “Scratch me”
  • Hind leg stand – “Play with me”
  • Head turn – “Get me that”
  • Shuffle – “Scratch me”
  • Back leg up – “Scratch me”
  • Paw hover – “Get me my toy”
  • Crawl under – “Get me my toy”
  • Flick toy – “I’m hungry”
  • Jump – “I’m hungry”
  • Paw reach – “Give me that”
  • Nose – “Scratch me”
  • Lick – “Scratch me”
  • Front paws on – “Open it”
  • Paw rest – “Get me my toy”
  • Head rub – “Get me my toy”
  • Chomp – “Play with me”
  • Paw – “Get me my toy”

As you can see, Fido may be redundant, and possibly dangle his participle.  But many of us dog owners agree that these gestures hit the mark as we get positive reinforcement by our pets when we oblige, another sign they possess fine communication skills.

UZ

So when a dog puts both paws on the door, he wants it open. When he wiggles his body and tushee underneath the chair or your foot, he wants to be played with.  When he lies back and lifts his leg, or presses his nose against you, he wants to be scratched.  And when he stands on his hind legs, he wants food.

Now this is all fine and dandy but I’ll be impressed with researchers when they teach us how to translate to dogs the following:

  • Let me sleep
  • Keep Grandma from coming inside the house
  • Quit pooping on my carpet……..

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

 

 

Posted in food, Health

Christmas: What Your Pets Can or Cannot Eat

Above: Shakey-Boo taking advantage of distracted hosts

Christmas is coming and so are the in-laws.  So to avoid being outnumbered at the dinner table, we invite our pets.  But can pets eat table scrapings and leftovers from Christmas?

Let’s look at what they can and cannot eat.

Dogs

UZ.jpg

According to the American Kennel Club, dogs can eat the following (in moderate amounts):

  • Turkey, Chicken, Beef (remove all bones so they don’t get swallowed and perforate the gut)
  • Ham
  • Shrimp
  • Salmon
  • Eggs
  • Cheese
  • Peanut Butter
  • Bread (with no raisins)
  • Popcorn
  • Corn
  • Honey
  • Coconut

Avoid the following in dogs:

May be toxic; cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea; kidney damage; pancreatitis due to high fat content, or intestinal obstruction

  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Raw Dough
  • Avocado
  • Raisins
  • Grapes
  • Chocolate
  • Cinnamon
  • Ice cream
  • Almonds
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Alcohol
  • Nutmeg
  • Mushrooms
  • Energy drinks
  • Fatty/fried foods and even the fat trimmings
  • Artificial Sweeteners such as Xylitol

And watch their portions. They will eat and eat and eat and won’t keep a tally on what grandma, nephew and the neighbors threw at him.

Cats

snappy.jpg

Fluffy or Snappy (above) can eat – but again only in moderation:

  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Grains
  • Vegetables (though many stick their nose up at it)
  • Eggs
  • Butter

Avoid similar foods as with dogs due to toxicity and also (according to Vetsnow)

  • Alcohol
  • Raw fish and eggs
  • Dairy products
  • Coffee, tea and energy drinks

 

Fish

fish

Yes, some will bring Nemo to Christmas dinner.

It appears fish can eat many types of meat and vegetables, scrambled eggs and even cooked rice but be careful of toxins. fats and cooking oils.

Parakeet

parakeet

I don’t have any of these and if I did, I doubt I’d share my turkey with it.  But according to pethelpful.com, many fruits, vegetables, breads and nuts (chopped up without shell) can be eaten by birdie.

 

Wishing everyone a Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news

Thanksgiving: Foods your pets can and cannot eat

Thanksgiving is coming and so are the in-laws.  So to avoid being outnumbered at the dinner table, we invite our pets.  But can pets eat table scrapings and leftovers from Thanksgiving?

 

Let’s look at what they can and cannot eat.

Dogs

dog

According to the American Kennel Club, dogs can eat the following (in moderate amounts):

Turkey, Chicken, Beef (remove all bones so they don’t get swallowed and perforate the gut)

Ham

Shrimp

Salmon

Eggs

Cheese

Peanut Butter

Bread (with no raisins)

Popcorn

Corn

Honey

Coconut

Avoid the following in dogs:

May be toxic; cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea; kidney damage; pancreatitis due to high fat content, or intestinal obstruction

Onions

Garlic

Avocado

Raisins

Grapes

Chocolate

Cinnamon

Ice cream

Almonds

Macadamia nuts

Alcohol

Nutmeg

Mushrooms

Energy drinks

Fatty/fried foods

 

In addition to my dog Apollo, I have 4 cats.  So they’re coming to Thanksgiving as well.

Cats

cat-1

Fluffy can eat – but again only in moderation:

Meat

Fish

Grains

Vegetables (though many stick their nose up at it)

Eggs

Cheese

Butter

Avoid similar foods as with dogs due to toxicity and also (according to Vetsnow)

Alcohol

Artificial Sweeteners

Raw fish and eggs

Coffee, tea and energy drinks

Fish

fish

Yes, some will bring Nemo to Thanksgiving Dinner.

It appears fish can eat many types of meat and vegetables and even cooked rice but be careful of toxins and cooking oils.

Parakeet

parakeet

I don’t have any of these and if I did, I doubt I’d share my turkey with it.  But according to pethelpful.com, many fruits, vegetables, breads and nuts (chopped up without shell) can be eaten by birdie.

 

Wishing everyone a healthy and wonderful Thanksgiving!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network and Board Certified Family Physician