Posted in drugs, Education, Health, news, sex, Social Media, teens

Is Your Teen in Trouble? Your Guide to Their Code Words and Phrases

This generation of teens communicates differently from any others as smartphone technology has outpaced the normal evolution of day-and-age vernacular. As a result, adolescents use short phrases, hashtags, abbreviations and emojis to convey their thoughts while parents and society scramble to catch up.

What Are They Saying? Your Guide to Teen Slang

However, within these bite-size “codes” or phrases could be volumes of meaning, some delineating at risk behavior, some foreboding suicide. 

While many parents are on the lookout for terms used such as “depressed”, “sad”, “wasting my life”, and “I’m a nobody”, Daily Mail reports Tik Tok users have been using cryptic phrases, such as those below, as “cries for help”. These include:

  • I had pasta tonight
  • I want to tell my mom my favorite pasta recipe
  • I’m living in Spain right now but the “s” is silent
  • My shampoo and conditioner are almost empty
  • I finished my shampoo and conditioner at the same time
Reaching out: TikTok users who are in desperate need of support have been posting variations of the codes in their captions and hashtags

The pandemic, and isolation from which, has left many adolescents feeling alone, sad, and despondent about the future. Many teens, as a result, will isolate further and not reach out to others. However, some might, as a last resort, look to social media for acceptance and love.

Some may use hashtags such as:

  • #mentalhealth
  • #nofuture
  • #sadness
  • #sad
  • #badday
  • #lifesucks
  • #worthless
  • #sadeits
  • #love
  • #alone
  • #broken
  • #remorse
  • #atmyend
  • #finished
  • #mood
  • #breakdown

Although some of these terms such as “love” appear harmless, they may indicate that the child may need help from a counselor, physician, or National Suicide Prevention Hotline.

Breaking the code

Generation Y’s (Millennials) and Z’s (those born after 1995) have learned to be concise, descriptive, and to the point as technology and social media encourage less characters/keys being used to get one’s point across.

Teens and young adults, therefore, may use codes that often come from the letters that correspond to the key pad on a phone. 

So here’s a guide to some of the unfamiliar terminology the young ‘uns are using:

Sex/Love

text night.jpg
  • NIFOC – nude in front of computer
  • CU46 – see you for sex
  • 8 – “ate” used in discussions on oral sex
  • 831 – I love you – “eight letters, three words, one you/meaning”
  • 143 – I love you (denotes letters on keypads, or #’s of letters in each word (love has 4 letters)
  • 2N8, 2NTE – tonight
  • 4AO – four adults only
  • 2B@ – to be at
  • 4EAE – for ever and ever
  • 53X – sex
  • 775 – kiss me
  • ?^ – hook up?
  • BAE – before anyone else
  • IWSN – I want sex now
  • ITX – intense text sex
  • NP4NP – naked pic for naked pic
  • 1174 – strip club

Unhappy/Angry

texting-1999275_1920-1024x731.jpg
  • < 3 – broken heart or heart
  • 182 – I hate you (1 stands for “I”, 8 stands for “hate”, 2 stands for “you”)
  • 2G2BT – Too good to be true
  • 2M2H – Too much to handle
  • Blarg, Blargh – similar to “darn” but deeper
  • Butthurt – receiving a personal insult
  • Salty – being bitter about something or someone
  • Watered – feeling sad, hurt
  • Wrecked – messed up
  • 4FS – For F***’s Sake
  • Poof – disappearing
  • ::poof:: – I’m gone
  • Ghost – disappear
  • 555555 – sobbing, crying one’s eyes out
  • ADIH – another day in Hell
  • KMN – kill me now
  • VSF – very sad face
  • KMS – kill myself
  • KYS – kill yourself
  • 187 – homicide

Drugs/Risky Behavior

drugs.jpg
  • 420 – marijuana
  • 420 – let’s get high
  • A/S/L/P – age/sex/location/picture
  • A3 – anytime, anyplace, anywhere
  • LMIRL – lets meet in real life
  • WYRN – what is your real name?
  • Chrismas tree – marijuana
  • Catnip – marijuana
  • Gold – drugs
  • Gummy Bears – drugs
  • Blues/Bananas – narcotics
  • Bars – benzodiazepines
  • Smarties/Skittles – Adderall/Ritalin
  • Ski Equipment/Yayo– cocaine
  • Cola – cocaine
  • Candy/Chocolate Chips/Sweets/Smarties/E – ecstasy
  • Crystal Skull/Wizard – synthetic marijuana
  • Hazel – heroin
  • Gat – gun/firearm
  • Lit – getting high/drunk
  • Smash(ed) – getting drunk, stoned, or having sex

Parents nearby

parents.jpg
  • 9 – parent is watching
  • 99 – parent is not watching anymore
  • P911 – parent alert (parent 911)
  • PAL – parents are listening
  • PAW – parents are watching
  • POS – parents over shoulder
  • AITR – adult in the room
  • CD9 – code 9 – parents in the room
  • KPC – keep parents clueless
  • RU/18 – are you over 18

And the above is just a small sample of some of the terms used these days.  This list continues to grow by the day so parents need to always be aware.  Kids want to KPC and avoid POS so be ready for the next group of codes being created as we speak……

Great Gift!!

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in food, Health, news

Death Reported After Eating Five Day Leftover Pasta

The death of a 20 year-old Belgium student who ate leftover pasta has gotten attention this week from a report published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

“A.J” had eaten spaghetti and tomato sauce that was prepared 5 days earlier and left at room temperature. Within 30 minutes he began feeling ill with abdominal pain, headache and nausea and vomiting.  Later that evening he had diarrhea and when his parents went to check on him the following morning he was found dead.

A post-mortem exam suspected he passed away within hours at approximately 4 am as a result of Bacillus cereus poisoning.

Dr. Bernard on a YouTube video highlighting the case report states he went into acute liver failure.

B. cereus bacteria reproduce quickly at room temperature and can produce an emetic toxin that causes illness within 30 minutes.

food-safety-illness-bacillus-cereus

Leftover food safety

To help avoid food poisoning, the USDA recommends the following:

  • Be aware of the “Danger Zone” in which bacteria can grow on food between the temperatures of 40 – 140 degrees F.
  • Refrigerate food within 2 hours, one hour if outside temperature is above 90 degrees.
  • Perishables should be kept refrigerated at 40 degrees F or colder
  • Wrap leftovers thoroughly to retain moisture and keep other bacteria out.
  • Throw out leftovers after 3-4 days. Food can be safely frozen for 3-4 months.
  • Cook food thoroughly. Red meat to 145 degree F, Ground meat to 160 degree F and poultry to 165 degree F.
  • Reheat food to 165 degrees.
  • Cool food quickly so food doesn’t stay hot in the refrigerator cultivating more bacteria. Divide food up into smaller containers to allow a speedier cool.
  • When in doubt throw it out.

 

spanish book

Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

Posted in diabetes, food, Health, news

Leftover Pasta May Be Better For Diabetics than Freshly Made

Pasta is usually a no-no for those with high blood sugar as it has a high glycemic index. But researchers reveal a trick to allow those with diabetes to enjoy the popular dish:  cooling and then reheating it the next day.

Express.co.uk reports the following:

 ……eating cooled or reheated pasta can help reduce the rise of blood glucose levels, according to an experiment led by the University of Surrey’s Dr Denise Robertson and TV doctor Chris van Tulleken.
This is because when starch is cooked in water and then cooled, it changes shape.
The new structure is resistant to enzymes in the body so can’t be digested, becoming what is known as ‘resistant starch’.
When regular starch becomes resistant starch, most of the sugars it contains aren’t released in the gut, meaning the body will take in fewer calories from the same food.

When study authors tested their theory, they found cooled and reheated pasta did not cause the same spike in blood sugar as freshly made pasta.  There was still a surge in blood sugar, but not as much.

What is resistant starch?

There are four classifications of resistant starch.

resistant starch 1.jpg

Resistant starches get their name by being “resistant” to digestion.  They are carbohydrates that don’t get broken down as easily and act like fiber. The less they are digested, the less their “sugar” can enter the blood stream (diabetes explained below).  Starches that are cooled and then reheated undergo changes in their carbohydrate composition, rendering them less vulnerable to enzymatic breakdown.

Foods with resistant starches are found to be more beneficial when it comes to  insulin sensitivity and gut health.  They include:

  • Legumes
  • Oats
  • Green Bananas
  • Whole grains
  • Cooked and cooled rice and potatoes

 

resistant-starch-1024x986.jpg

 

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn’t utilize and metabolize sugar properly.  When we consume food, its broken down into proteins, nutrients, fats, water, and sugar. These components are necessary for cell growth and function.  They get absorbed in the small intestine and make it to the blood stream.   In order for a cell to utilize sugar, it needs the hormone insulin to help guide it in.  It’s similar to a key that fits in the keyhole of the “door” of the cell, opening it up so sugar can enter.  Insulin is produced in the pancreas, an organ that receives signals when one eats to release insulin in preparation of the sugar load coming down the pike.

Diabetes Explained

So I imagine our mouth like a waiting room, the blood stream like a hallway, and the cells of the body the rooms along the hallway.  Insulin is the key to open the cells’ “doors” allowing sugar to enter.  If the sugar does not get in, it stays in the bloodstream “hallway” and doesn’t feed the cell.  Weight loss occurs, and individuals may become more thirsty as the sugar in the blood makes it fairly osmotic, something the body wants to neutralize, reduce.  The kidneys are going to want dump the excess sugar, so to do so, one would urinate more, again causing thirst.  So when a diabetic loses weight, urinates more frequently and becomes thirsty, you now understand why.

Complications of Diabetes

Cardiovascular disease – Sugar is sticky, so it can easily add to atherosclerotic plaques.

Blindness – high sugar content draws in water to neutralize and small blood vessels in the eye can only take so much fluid before they burst.  Moreover, high blood sugar weakens blood vessels.

Kidney disease – the kidneys work overtime to eliminate the excess sugar. Moreover, sugar laden blood isn’t the healthiest when they themselves need nourishment.

Infections – pathogens love sugar. Its food for them.  Moreover blood laden with sugar doesn’t allow immune cells to work in the most opportune environment.

Neuropathy – nerves don’t receive adequate blood supply due to the diabetes-damaged blood flow and vessels, hence they become dull or hypersensitive causing diabetics to have numbness or pain.

Dementia – as with the heart and other organs, the brain needs healthy blood and flow.  Diabetes has been found to increase risk of Alzheimer’s as well.

Type I vs. Type II Diabetes

Type I Diabetes, previously called insulin dependent or Juvenile diabetes, occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin, possibly from the immune system destroying the cells that produce the hormone. When this occurs there is rapid weight loss and death could occur if the cells don’t get the sugar they need.  Insulin has to be administered regularly.

Type II Diabetes, previously called non-insulin dependent or adult-onset diabetes,  occurs in those who began with a fully functioning pancreas but as they age the pancreas produces less insulin, called insulin deficiency, or the insulin produced meets resistance.  This is the fastest growing type of diabetes in both children and adults.

What is insulin resistance?

Insulin resistance, if using our hallway and door analogy, is as if someone is pushing against the door the insulin is trying to unlock. As we know, those with obesity are at higher risk for diabetes, hence fat can increase insulin resistance.  It’s also been associated with an increase in heart disease.

Blood sugar numbers

If your fasting blood sugar (glucose) is greater than 126 mg/dl, or your non fasting blood sugar is greater than 200 mg/dl, you may be considered diabetic.  Pre-diabetes occurs when the fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dl.  If ignored, and the sugar rises, pre-diabetics may go on to develop diabetes.

 

dmp-blood-sugar-levels-chart

SOURCE DIABETESMEALPLANS.COM

Preventing/Controlling Diabetes

1/3 of American adults are currently pre-diabetic.  Experts predict 1/3 of US Adults will be diabetic by the year 2050.  Although genetics plays a big role, decreasing ones sugar intake and maintaining an active lifestyle can help ward of diabetes.

Foods high in sugar and carbohydrates increase one’s risk, so a diet rich in vegetables and lean meats is preferred.

For more information, visit http://www.diabetes.org/.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada