Posted in Health, news, Politics

Hepatitis A Outbreak Now Delcared in LA County

The Hepatitis A Outbreak which has killed at least 16 people in San Diego and sickened hundreds more has now surfaced in LA County.

Doug McIntyre of Los Angeles’ KABC McIntyre in the Morning reported 10 people confirmed thus far infected in LA county, primarily affecting the homeless population.  This number is expected to rise.

The Hepatitis A virus is spread by contaminated feces, and many homeless persons lack access to public restrooms and showers.

San Diego County Public Health Officer Wilma Wooten suggested the recent plastic bag ban might have contributed to the outbreak as homeless individuals would use the plastic bag to excrete their waste into and then toss.  Wooten states, “We know people don’t have bathrooms and they can put bags in cans and buckets and maintain good hygiene. That’s why we put plastic bags in the hygiene kits we’re handing out. That’s what we expect people will use them for.”

Hygiene kits have been dispensed containing plastic bags, sanitizer, bottled water, wet wipes and feminine sanitary products.

Without the plastics bags, they are forced to poop without an easy means of clean up, leaving contaminated feces on the sidewalks, streets and encampments.

dog-poop-bags.jpg

City officials in both San Diego and Los Angeles have been spraying the streets with bleach-spiked water.

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a disease that affects the liver.  Its caused by a virus (Hepatitis A virus) that is most commonly ingested. Poor hand washing and/or contaminated food are likely culprits.  Its transmitted by the fecal-oral route, where food or drink contaminated by fecal matter enters another person’s GI tract.  Sexual transmission of Hepatitis A has been reported during activities involving oral-anal sex.

Hepatitis A can live outside the body for months, so unclean dining areas can be contaminated and transfer to food.

Those who are immunosuppressed run the risk of dying from the infection.

 

What are the symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Symptoms of Hepatitis A include:

Jaundice – yellowing of the skin and eyes

Fever

Abdominal Pain

Fatigue

Dark Urine

Joint Pain

Clay – looking stools

Diarrhea

Nausea

Vomiting

Loss of appetite

Hepatitis-A.jpg

 

What is the treatment for Hepatitis A?

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A.  Most hepatitis A infections resolve on their own.

We usually recommend rest, fluids, and offer medications to help with nausea and vomiting.

For liver injury we avoid medications and alcohol that can worsen liver damage. The liver will usually recover within months after hepatitis A infection.

There are vaccines for Hepatitis A included in the childhood vaccination schedule.  Those older who weren’t vaccinated as a child can get the vaccine from their local provider or health department.  Many states require all health care and food workers to be vaccinated.

The best form of prevention however is good hand washing, dining area hygiene, and cooking food thoroughly.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news, Politics

San Diego Declares Public Health Emergency as Hundreds Sickened by Hepatitis A

San Diego County has declared a public health emergency in light of 15 dead after a Hepatitis A outbreak that has sickened hundreds.

350 – 400 people have reportedly fallen ill and 15 have died since the outbreak of the virus began in November of 2016.

70% of the cases were homeless individuals, lacking good sanitation and immunocompromised due to their lack of nutrition and possible drug/alcohol use.  10 people have died within the last 8 weeks.

The declaration allows the Health and Human Services Agency to obtain funding and assistance to implement new sanitizing  measures that are modelled after other Southern California cities such as Los Angeles.

40 portable hand washing stations will be provided in areas of high homeless populations. Crews will use bleach-spiked water in high pressure hoses to clean feces and bodily fluids from contaminated areas including streets.

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a disease that affects the liver.  Its caused by a virus (Hepatitis A virus) that is most commonly ingested. Poor hand washing and/or contaminated food are likely culprits.  Its transmitted by the fecal-oral route, where food or drink contaminated by fecal matter enters another person’s GI tract.  Sexual transmission of Hepatitis A has been reported during activities involving oral-anal sex.

Hepatitis A can live outside the body for months, so unclean dining areas can be contaminated and transfer to food.

Those who are immunosuppressed run the risk of dying from the infection.

 

What are the symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Symptoms of Hepatitis A include:

Jaundice – yellowing of the skin and eyes

Fever

Abdominal Pain

Fatigue

Dark Urine

Joint Pain

Clay – looking stools

Diarrhea

Nausea

Vomiting

Loss of appetite

Hepatitis-A.jpg

 

What is the treatment for Hepatitis A?

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A.  Most hepatitis A infections resolve on their own.

We usually recommend rest, fluids, and offer medications to help with nausea and vomiting.

For liver injury we avoid medications and alcohol that can worsen liver damage. The liver will usually recover within months after hepatitis A infection.

 

There are vaccines for Hepatitis A included in the childhood vaccination schedule.  Those older who weren’t vaccinated as a child can get the vaccine from their local provider or health department.  Many states require all health care and food workers to be vaccinated.

The best form of prevention however is good hand washing, dining area hygiene, and cooking food thoroughly.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in food, Health, news

Hepatitis A Kills 14 in San Diego

A southern California city is reporting the “deadliest outbreak” of Hepatitis A that the US has seen in decades.

264 people have been hospitalized and 14 dead since the outbreak of the virus began in November of 2016.

70% of the cases were homeless individuals, lacking good sanitation and immunocompromised due to their lack of nutrition and possible drug/alcohol use.  9 people have died within the last 6 weeks.

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a disease that affects the liver.  Its caused by a virus (Hepatitis A virus) that is most commonly ingested. Poor hand washing and/or contaminated food are likely culprits.  Its transmitted by the fecal-oral route, where food or drink contaminated by fecal matter enters another person’s GI tract.  Sexual transmission of Hepatitis A has been reported during activities involving oral-anal sex.

Hepatitis A can live outside the body for months, so unclean dining areas can be contaminated and transfer to food.

Those who are immunosuppressed run the risk of dying from the infection.

 

What are the symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Symptoms of Hepatitis A include:

Jaundice – yellowing of the skin and eyes

Fever

Abdominal Pain

Fatigue

Dark Urine

Joint Pain

Clay – looking stools

Diarrhea

Nausea

Vomiting

Loss of appetite

Hepatitis-A.jpg

 

What is the treatment for Hepatitis A?

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A.  Most hepatitis A infections resolve on their own.

We usually recommend rest, fluids, and offer medications to help with nausea and vomiting.

For liver injury we avoid medications and alcohol that can worsen liver damage. The liver will usually recover within months after hepatitis A infection.

 

There are vaccines for Hepatitis A included in the childhood vaccination schedule.  Those older who weren’t vaccinated as a child can get the vaccine from their local provider or health department.  Many states require all health care and food workers to be vaccinated.

The best form of prevention however is good hand washing, dining area hygiene, and cooking food thoroughly.

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician