Posted in cell phones, Health, news, smart devices

SmartPhones Again Linked to Temporary Blindness or “Eye Strokes”

Two new cases of “smartphone blindness” has been described in the last month.   One case was a gentleman in China who was playing games on his phone at night and suffered a retinal artery occlusion or “eye stroke”.
Another case was a woman in China, who was also playing on her phone at night but she sustained a bleed in her left eye.  
Just as those who suffer from cerebral strokes, a “lack of blood flow” to the retina, or layer of the eye that helps create visual images, can be caused by a clot or hemorrhage.  Apparently these can be induced with excessive focusing and eye strain.
This may result in temporary or permanent blindness.
Updated from June 23, 2016
Some people are being evaluated for stroke or transient ischemic attacks when they come to the ER complaining of recurrent “temporary blindness” after checking their smartphone in the dark.  This phenomenon, known as ‘smartphone blindness’, has been experienced by many of us when we have the sensation of dimmed vision or poor visual acuity, feeling punished for peeking at our email when we should be sleeping.

 

In 2016, doctors reviewed the cases of two women who experienced episodes of “temporary blindness”; as the ladies put their cell phone down, one eye could not see the cell phone for 15 minutes.  Their vision restored after this length of time.Doctors investigated the cases thoroughly with a variety of medical tests including MRI’s and couldn’t find the cause.

Finally they conclude these transient episodes of “vision loss” were harmless, in that one eye was being used to look at the phone and the other eye needed time to “catch up”.  When the women, as many of us do, check our phones, one eye is snugly closed and resting on a pillow while the other is available to look at the phone.  When the ladies would turn over, the closed eye didn’t have a chance to catch up to the increased brightness of the phone screen, hence having a dimmed view.

If one uses both eyes to look at the screen, this phenomenon does not happen.

Smartphone Blindness Studies Are Cause For Concern

Studies surfaced a few years ago where great lengths of smartphone use can cause retinal detachment.  In these cases the layer of the retina which focuses images, detaches from the back of the eye, causing serious vision loss.  Though there are treatments, if not treated early can cause permanent blindness in the affected eye since the retina loses its blood and oxygen supply when detached.  A woman from China had been using her smartphone for 2-3 hours in the dark each night when this occurred.

Smartphones have also been linked to myopia, nearsightedness and sleeping disorders as the blue light emitted from the screen can disrupt melatonin production.

A recent study found that 30% of adults spend more than 9 hours a day using their smartphone. Physicians recommend avoiding extended use, adjust settings to black text on white background, and with this recent case study, use both eyes to look at the screen when using the phone at night.

Increasing the size of the font helps your eyes since they don’t need to strain as much to read.  Try to look at your smartphone with a distance of 1 1/2 feet. Blinking often helps rest the eyes as well and keeps them lubricated and moist.

Additionally, avoid using the phone in the dark, but in a lit room.

 

Finally its good to use the 20,20,20 rule.  After every 20 minutes of use, look away at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.  This may help avoid eyestrain from excessive smartphone use.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in drugs, Education, Health, news, opioids, sex, suicide

Is Your Teen in Trouble? Your Guide to Their Code Words

This generation of teens communicates differently from any others as smartphone technology has outpaced the normal evolution of day-and-age vernacular. As a result, adolescents use abbreviations and emojis to convey their thoughts while parents and society scramble to catch up.

What Are They Saying? Your Guide to Teen Slang

However, within these bite-size “codes” could be volumes of meaning, some delineating at risk behavior, some foreboding suicide.  These codes many times come from the letters that correspond to the key pad on a phone.  So here’s a guide to some of the unfamiliar terminology the young ‘uns are using:

 

Sex/Love

text night.jpg

  • NIFOC – nude in front of computer
  • CU46 – see you for sex
  • 8 – “ate” used in discussions on oral sex
  • 831 – I love you – “eight letters, three words, one you/meaning”
  • 143 – I love you (denotes letters on keypads, or #’s of letters in each word (love has 4 letters)
  • 2N8, 2NTE – tonight
  • 4AO – four adults only
  • 2B@ – to be at
  • 4EAE – for ever and ever
  • 53X – sex
  • 775 – kiss me
  • ?^ – hook up?
  • BAE – before anyone else
  • IWSN – I want sex now
  • ITX – intense text sex
  • NP4NP – naked pic for naked pic
  • 1174 – strip club

 

Unhappy/Angry

 

texting-1999275_1920-1024x731.jpg

  • < 3 – broken heart or heart
  • 182 – I hate you (1 stands for “I”, 8 stands for “hate”, 2 stands for “you”)
  • 2G2BT – Too good to be true
  • 2M2H – Too much to handle
  • Blarg, Blargh – similar to “darn” but deeper
  • Butthurt – receiving a personal insult
  • Salty – being bitter about something or someone
  • Watered – feeling sad, hurt
  • Wrecked – messed up
  • 4FS – For F***’s Sake
  • Poof – disappearing
  • ::poof:: – I’m gone
  • Ghost – disappear
  • 555555 – sobbing, crying one’s eyes out
  • ADIH – another day in Hell
  • KMN – kill me now
  • VSF – very sad face
  • KMS – kill myself
  • KYS – kill yourself
  • 187 – homicide

 

Drugs/Risky Behavior (to be revisited more in depth)

drugs.jpg

  • 420 – marijuana
  • 420 – let’s get high
  • A/S/L/P – age/sex/location/picture
  • A3 – anytime, anyplace, anywhere
  • LMIRL – lets meet in real life
  • WYRN – what is your real name?
  • Chrismas tree – marijuana
  • Catnip – marijuana
  • Gold – drugs
  • Gummy Bears – drugs
  • Blues/Bananas – narcotics
  • Bars – benzodiazepines
  • Smarties/Skittles – Adderall/Ritalin
  • Ski Equipment/Yayo– cocaine
  • Cola – cocaine
  • Candy/Chocolate Chips/Sweets/Smarties/E – ecstasy
  • Crystal Skull/Wizard – synthetic marijuana
  • Hazel – heroin
  • Gat – gun/firearm
  • Lit – getting high/drunk
  • Smash(ed) – getting drunk, stoned, or having sex

 

Parents nearby

parents.jpg

  • 9 – parent is watching
  • 99 – parent is not watching anymore
  • P911 – parent alert (parent 911)
  • PAL – parents are listening
  • PAW – parents are watching
  • POS – parents over shoulder
  • AITR – adult in the room
  • CD9 – code 9 – parents in the room
  • KPC – keep parents clueless
  • RU/18 – are you over 18

 

And the above is just a small sample of some of the terms used these days.  This list continues to grow by the day so parents need to always be aware.  Kids want to KPC and avoid POS so be ready for the next group of codes being created as we speak……

 

 

dw sketch.jpg

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

Posted in Health, news

Stop Using Your Cell Phone While On The Toilet

Experts are warning that using your smartphone while sitting on the crapper could put one at risk for a variety of ailments.

Pathogens and Superbugs

Firstly, the obvious, pathogens.  When you take a phone into the bathroom, and swap hands to use toilet paper, something is going to get contaminated.  Then, the average phone can’t withstand a sink washing, so the phone carries toilet germs out of the bathroom and to your work desk, kitchen table, or car dash.  Bacteria such as E. coli, C. difficile, and Staph. aureus are just a few of the deadly bugs one can pick up and harbor on their cell phone.

Smartphone Blindness

Using a bright cell phone while in a dimly lit bathroom can induce what experts call “smartphone blindness.”   And experts claim the vision loss could, in minute levels, be permanent as the blue light from the phone reacts with retinal, an active form of Vitamin A, that can damage the nearby photoreceptor cells that need to be stimulated when creating sight.  Once damaged they may not ever recover.

Cellphone Use Could Cause Permanent Vision Loss

 

Rectal prolapse

Last February it was reported a man was sitting on his toilet for 30 minutes when he prolapsed his rectum.  The patient had issues with constipation and previously suffered a partial prolapse that was not treated.  But sitting for extended periods of time and pushing while constipated caused the perfect storm.

Man’s Rectum Falls Out While Playing Video Games on the Toilet

 

Hemorrhoids

Sitting for extended periods while pushing stool can cause valves in perianal veins to collapse, causing vein collapse. This produces painful, itchy, hemorrhoids.

ds00096_im01772_r7_hemorrhoidsthu_jpg

 

Sciatica

Low back pain and leg numbness may ensue from sitting for an extended period of time because lumbar spine nerves get irritated.

The moral, don’t spend anymore time on the potty than you need to. Video games are distracting and tempt you to complete “the next level.”  You can do so, but after you pull up your pants and get off the porcelain throne.

 

dw sketch.jpg

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

 

 

 

 

Posted in Health, news, smart devices

Cellphone Use Could Cause Permanent Vision Loss

Avoid the blue light exposure in the dark
Last year we learned that some patients, who were evaluated for a stroke or transient ischemic attack when they had come to the ER complaining of recurrent “temporary blindness” after checking their smartphone in the dark were suffering from a phenomenon, known as ‘smartphone blindness’.  This has also been experienced by many of us when we have the sensation of dimmed vision or poor visual acuity, feeling punished for peeking at our email when we should be sleeping.

But now we have a study suggesting vision loss could be permanent due to the blue light being emitted from our smartphones or laptops.

Researchers from the University of Toledo found blue light will react with retinal, an active form of Vitamin A, that can damage the nearby cells they are designed to stimulate when creating sight.

Researcher Kasun Ratnayake states, “If you shine blue light on retinal, the retinal kills photoreceptor cells as the signaling molecule on the membrane dissolves,” and since these cells do not regenerate they are gone for good.

Although a blue-light induced retinal activated cell could prove useful when fighting cancer, this finding is worrisome as millions of people, including children, look at their smartphone and tablet in the dark, depending on the blue light more and more to see their screens.

blue light danger for retina

What is blue light?

Sunlight is made up of the spectrum of colors including red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple.  Blue light is a light along the spectrum that has shorter wavelengths and more energy than red, which has longer wavelengths.  We receive most of our blue light exposure from the sun but we can be exposed as well through our smart devices, LED lights and CFL (compact fluorescent light) bulbs.

spectrum

Image from preventblindness.org

 

 

Smartphone use linked to retinal detachment

Studies surfaced a few years ago where great lengths of smartphone use can cause retinal detachment.  In these cases the layer of the retina which focuses images, detaches from the back of the eye, causing serious vision loss.  Though there are treatments, if not treated early can cause permanent blindness in the affected eye since the retina loses its blood and oxygen supply when detached.  A woman from China had been using her smartphone for 2-3 hours in the dark each night when this occurred.

Smartphones have also been linked to myopia, near-sightedness, and sleeping disorders as the blue light emitted from the screen can disrupt melatonin production.

A recent study found that 30% of adults spend more than 9 hours a day using their smartphone. Physicians recommend avoiding extended use, adjust settings to black text on white background, and with this recent case study, use both eyes to look at the screen when using the phone at night.

 

Smartphone, Street Lamp Blue Light May Increase Risk of Cancer

A study from the University of Exeter and Barcelona Institute for Global Health finds blue light exposure at night-time to increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer.

Blue light is emitted from artificial lighting, such as LED’s and smart devices, and has been linked in the past to cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Why?  Scientists believe the blue wavelengths in the light disrupt our circadian rhythm, or our body’s biological clock, by suppressing the secretion of melatonin. Poor sleep, and unpredictable body cycles, can affect our metabolism, hence our weight, diabetes risk and cancer risk.

In this study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers reviewed data of more than 4000 patients, between the ages of 20 and 85, from 11 different geographical regions.  They found exposure to blue light at night doubled the risk of prostate cancer in men, and increased breast cancer risk in women by 1.5.

The Sun reports study author Dr. Alejandro Sánchez de Miguel is urging to reduce exposure to outside street lights and use orange wavelength light rather than blue.

“The take-home message is: Use warm orange lights where possible, and shutters and blinds to block street light.

“Also, our findings suggest reducing your night-time exposure to smartphones and tablets could help cut cancer risk.

How to protect your eyes by minimizing blue light exposure

The recommendation to not use your smartdevice at night may not be very practical for many.  So here are some additional tips:

Increasing the size of the font helps your eyes since they don’t need to strain as much to read.  Try to look at your smartphone with a distance of 1 1/2 feet. Blinking often helps rest the eyes as well and keeps them lubricated and moist.

 

Screen time should be limited in the evenings.  Avoid computer/phone screens at least 2-3 hours before bed.

Although LED light bulbs are more energy-efficient, bedroom lighting may need to be swapped for softer bulbs.

If the weather permits, getting some night air and watching the stars may help stimulate one’s melatonin, allowing him/her to get sleepy.

Blue-blocking glasses may help limit exposure if night computer work cannot be avoided.

Additionally there are apps that allow a blue light filter on one’s phone screen.

 

Finally its good to use the 20,20,20 rule.  After every 20 minutes of use, look away at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.  This may help avoid eyestrain from excessive smartphone use.

 

dw sketch.jpg

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada

Posted in Health, news, smart devices

Alexa Records and Transmits Private Home Conversation: Are Cell Phones Safe?

Above image from Verge.com

A Portland family’s Amazon Echo recorded a private conversation and sent it to one of their employees without their consent.

Danielle, who’s last name was held private, was discussing with her husband a private conversation that included a discussion on wood flooring.  The Amazon Echo device recorded it, sent it to her husband’s employee who then contacted the couple concerned that their device was “hacked”.

In an interview USA Today, Amazon offered the following explanation:

The Echo woke up when someone in the home said something that sounded to it like “Alexa.” 

Next, the subsequent conversation included something that, to Alexa, sounded like a “send a message” request.

At which point, Alexa said out loud, “To whom?” 

Next, Alexa interpreted the background conversation as a name in the customers’ contact list. 

Alexa then asked, again out loud, “[Contact name], right?” 

Alexa then interpreted background conversation as confirming with, “Right.”

In my opinion the probability of a flooring conversation triggering all these prompts is one in a billion and I suspect these smart home devices are always on and the trigger words prompt a second order task.

Which brings us to the question, do all smart devices record our every sound?

Multiple testimonials have arisen of people finding ads pop up on their social media moments after having a private conversation in their office or home.

An “OK Google” or “Hey Siri” can prompt a listening feature as well, and many sounds, dialects, or word groupings may dupe the technology.  Some have reported a “Lake Erie” or “No noodles!” has triggered their phones to respond back.  If speakers are at a farther distance from the device or overshadowed by other conversations, fumbled word receptions may occur.

CBS News reported the following:

Google and Facebook have both denied using cellphone microphones to collect information for ads. In a statement, Google wrote: “We do not use ambient sound from any device to target ads.” While Facebook didn’t respond to our request for comment, it’s previously said: “We show ads based on people’s interests and other profile information — not what you’re talking out loud about.”

So we want to believe that we’re safe, but the possibility of our private work meetings, dinners, or drives to the in-laws can house evidence of bad mouthing is frightening beyond words.  So this loud mouth is going to start keeping quiet when technology is around…..

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news

Smartphone, Street Lamp Blue Light May Increase Risk of Cancer

A study from the University of Exeter and Barcelona Institute for Global Health finds blue light exposure at night-time to increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer.

Blue light is emitted from artificial lighting, such as LED’s and smart devices, and has been linked in the past to cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Why?  Scientists believe the blue wavelengths in the light disrupt our circadian rhythm, or our body’s biological clock, by suppressing the secretion of melatonin. Poor sleep, and unpredictable body cycles, can affect our metabolism, hence our weight, diabetes risk and cancer risk.

In this study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers reviewed data of more than 4000 patients, between the ages of 20 and 85, from 11 different geographical regions.  They found exposure to blue light at night doubled the risk of prostate cancer in men, and increased breast cancer risk in women by 1.5.

The Sun reports study author Dr. Alejandro Sánchez de Miguel is urging to reduce exposure to outside street lights and use orange wavelength light rather than blue.

“The take-home message is: Use warm orange lights where possible, and shutters and blinds to block street light.

“Also, our findings suggest reducing your night-time exposure to smartphones and tablets could help cut cancer risk.

How to minimize blue light exposure

Screen time should therefore be limited in the evenings.  Avoid computer/phone screens at least 2-3 hours before bed.

Although LED light bulbs are more energy-efficient, bedroom lighting may need to be swapped for softer bulbs.

If the weather permits, getting some night air and watching the stars may help stimulate one’s melatonin, allowing him/her to get sleepy.

Blue-blocking glasses may help limit exposure if night computer work cannot be avoided.

Additionally there are apps that allow a blue light filter on one’s phone screen.

 

This is a developing story.

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news

Man’s Rectum Falls Out While Playing Video Games on the Toilet

The Daily Mail reports a Chinese man suffered a case of rectal prolapse while he sat on the toilet for 30 minutes playing video games.

The unnamed patient went to the hospital Feb. 4th with his rectal tissue, still attached, hanging outside of his body.  He was treated by Dr. Su Dan from the Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.

The patient had issues with constipation and previously suffered a partial prolapse that was not treated.

Video game use during pooping has replaced using a magazine as the games are more enjoyable and “distracting”, allowing for some easy passage of stool.  However, video games could interfere with one’s bowel movements as stress and anxiety may take over while playing the game causing one to “clamp up”.

Others choose to play video games in the toilet to avoid family members who may interrupt or interfere with the game.  The bathroom may be our only “man/woman cave”.

What is rectal prolapse?

rectalprolapse_vs_hemorrhoid

The rectum is the most distal, final part of the colon before opening to the outside through the anus.  The lining (partial) or the entire (full) wall of the rectum can slide distally to the outside, but still stay attached to the body.

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While some prolapses may resolve on their own, many need surgery.  Avoiding constipation by eating a diet balanced with fiber and plenty of water helps prevent the need to strain and hence a possible rectal prolapse.  Kegel, pelvic and anal floor exercises may help to strengthen the muscles that keep the rectum from prolapsing.  However, avoiding forceful straining and longer term toilet sitting is paramount.  The moral, don’t bring your smartphone into the potty with you.

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Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

 

Posted in Entertainment, Health, news

Woman Goes Blind in One Eye After Playing Game on Phone for Hours

Image above from Shutterstock

A 21 year old woman from Dongguan, China suffered a retinal artery occlusion after a full-day smartphone video game marathon.

Wu Xiaojing claimed to have played the game, Arena of Valor/Honor of Kings, for 7-8 hours in a row one weekend.  The game is very popular in China and is gaining popularity world wide.  According to PocketGamer.biz, the game bagged more than 50 million daily active users in January 2017.

popular-mobile-moba-honor-kings-headed-west-arena-valor-1210x642.jpg

 

 

Xiaojing worked in finance, staring at a computer screen at work all day.  She admitted in an interview, “During my days off, I would wake up at 6am, eat breakfast and start playing until around 4pm. I would stop and eat something before taking a short nap and continue playing until 1am or 2am. Sometimes, I would even be too lazy to stop and eat.”

Xiaojing’s vision began to dim when she took a break at dinner time and then it completely disappeared.  She sought immediate medical help and its unclear if she will regain her vision.  Doctors believe the eyestrain from hours upon hours of play caused a retinal artery occlusion.

 

What is a retinal artery occlusion?

A retinal artery occlusion is basically a stroke that affects the eye.  The retinal artery supplies blood to the retina.  The retina is crucial for vision as it lines the back of the eye, collects light signals, and converts them into neural signals that the brain can differentiate and process.

central-retinal-artery-occlusion-330x330@2x

Retinal artery occasions are painless and come on suddenly.  Arteriosclerosis causes the majority of retinal artery occlusions, however many other causes include:

Inflammatory diseases such as lupus

Clotting disorders

Medications including birth control pills

Drugs including cocaine

Infections such as syphilis

and retinal “migraine” or vasospasm of the retinal artery.

There’s a possibility that the woman’s marathon of video game playing caused a vasospasm of the retinal artery.  The sooner the occlusion is medically addressed, the better the chance to restore vision.  However 2/3 of cases result in poor vision restoration as the retina is very sensitive to lack of blood flow for any amount of time.

 

Can video games cause other visual problems?

Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) has been described as visual issues stemming from chronic staring at a computer screen. Symptoms can include dry eyes, blurry vision, headaches, neck and back pain.

There’s been controversy whether smartphone use can cause retinal detachment, eye cancer and nearsightedness in children.  More research is being done in these areas.

In 2009, however, a study out of the University of Rochester found video game playing to IMPROVE vision as it enhanced the ability to discern shades of gray by 58% in gamers.

 

How can I avoid vision issues when it comes to my computer/smartphone?

Firstly, remember the 20-20-20 rule:

Every 20 minutes take a break, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds

Secondly, keep blinking. We forget to blink when we’re mesmerized by cool graphics and bright colors on our screen.  Dry eyes can worsen vision, so keep blinking.

Thirdly avoid glare.  Light from a window or lamp can produce a glare on your screen, irritating your eyes.  Move the screen to avoid the glare.

Fourthly, take care of your neck.  Positioning the computer screen so you don’t have to strain your neck will reduce headaches and muscle strain. The monitor should be slightly below eye level and at least 20 inches away from your face.

Finally, visit your eye doctor regularly.  He may be able to prescribe you glasses that allow less eystrain when you do computer work.

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news

Today’s Health Headlines

Mysterious polio-like paralyzing illness surging and is fatal

Washington state officials are investigating a cluster of cases of what they are calling acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), possibly caused by a virus similar to polio, and taking the life of a 6 year old boy. There are 89 cases in over 33 states thus far.  Here is what we know…..

https://doctordaliah.wordpress.com/2016/11/02/mysterious-paralyzing-illness-on-the-rise-what-is-afm/

Study finds car interiors 2100% dirtier than our smartphones

Researchers even found MRSA.  The majority of drivers don’t seem too concerned about how dirty is there car interior

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3893612/Is-car-health-hazard-Study-reveals-vehicle-interiors-2-144-filthier-smartphones.html

Premature births in the US on the rise

This rise is the first time in 8 years and it appears to be the greatest in African American and American Indian and Alaska Native women.

http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20161101/us-premature-births-rise-for-1st-time-in-8-years

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network and Board Certified Family Physician

 

Posted in Health, news

What is ‘Smartphone Blindness’?

By Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP

Updated from June 23, 2016

Some people are being evaluated for stroke or transient ischemic attacks when they come to the ER complaining of recurrent “temporary blindness” after checking their smartphone in the dark.  This phenomenon, known as ‘smartphone blindness’, has been experienced by many of us when we have the sensation of dimmed vision or poor visual acuity, feeling punished for peeking at our email when we should be sleeping.

In this study doctors reviewed the cases of two women who experienced episodes of “temporary blindness”; as the ladies put their cell phone down, one eye could not see the cell phone for 15 minutes.  Their vision restored after this length of time.

Doctors investigated the cases thoroughly with a variety of medical tests including MRI’s and couldn’t find the cause.

Finally they conclude these transient episodes of “vision loss” were harmless, in that one eye was being used to look at the phone and the other eye needed time to “catch up”.  When the women, as many of us do, check our phones, one eye is snuggly closed and resting on a pillow while the other is available to look at the phone.  When the ladies would turn over, the closed eye didn’t have a chance to catch up to the increased brightness of the phone screen, hence having a dimmed view.

If one uses both eyes to look at the screen, this phenomenon does not happen.

Smartphone Blindness Studies Are Cause For Concern

Studies surfaced a few years ago where great lengths of smartphone use can cause retinal detachment.  In these cases the layer of the retina which focuses images, detaches from the back of the eye, causing serious vision loss.  Though there are treatments, if not treated early can cause permanent blindness in the affected eye since the retina loses its blood and oxygen supply when detached.  A woman from China had been using her smartphone for 2-3 hours in the dark each night when this occurred.

Smartphones have also been linked to myopia, near sightedness and sleeping disorders as the blue light emitted from the screen can disrupt melatonin production.

A recent study found that 30% of adults spend more than 9 hours a day using their smartphone. Physicians recommend avoiding extended use, adjust settings to black text on white background, and with this recent case study, use both eyes to look at the screen when using the phone at night.

Increasing the size of the font helps your eyes since they don’t need to strain as much to read.  Try to look at your smartphone with a distance of 1 1/2 feet. Blinking often helps rest the eyes as well and keeps them lubricated and moist.

 

Finally its good to use the 20,20,20 rule.  After every 20 minutes of use, look away at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.  This may help avoid eyestrain from excessive smartphone use.

For more on this story, read here:

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/23/smartphone-users-temporarily-blinded-looking-screen-in-bed