Posted in Health, Millennials, students, suicide, teens, vaping

Teen Suicide Rates Soaring…Is Vaping and Nicotine Dependency a Cause?

The CDC reported this week that teen suicide rose 58% over the years 2007-2017 in the age group 10-24.  Although many experts blame social media and teen drug use, one theory may need to be considered:  nicotine withdrawal from vaping.

Millions of middle school and high school students admit to vaping…and many more are assumed who don’t admit to it when surveyed.  So we have an underestimation of how many adolescents take regular hits of their electronic cigarette, exposing them to the powerful, addictive nicotine. One pod, placed in an electronic cigarette to be vaped, contains as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.  Hence if a pod is smoked at school, and when the child is home goes hours without, they may “come down” off the nicotine high that they had hours earlier.

In 2002 Picciotto et al discussed how nicotine can affect mood swings, anxiety and depression, where in some cases it can act as an antidepressant but when one withdrawals from it can have increased and anxiety and depression.

The teenage mind and psyche is still developing during this time and a chemical dependency could muddy the mental health waters.

There’s no doubt social media and the misconception teens have that their lives are not as glorious as those who they view online is contributing to lack of confidence, poor self-esteem and depression.  But the decision to commit suicide may also be chemically induced, or a withdrawal of one and should be investigated.

Vaping Linked to Heart Disease and Cancer

 

A study from New York University found the nicotine in electronic cigarettes to cause DNA damage similar to cigarette smoking.

Dr. Moon-shong Tang and his colleagues exposed mice to e-cig smoke during a three-month period, 5 days a week for three hours a day.  They found these mice, compared to those breathing filtered air, to have DNA damage to cells in their bladders, lungs and hearts. The amount of nicotine inhaled was approximately 10mg/ml.   That dose would be commonly consumed by many humans who vape.

nicotine.jpg

They then looked at human bladder and lung cells and found tumor cells were able to grow more easily once exposed to nicotine and vaping chemicals.

Last May, researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville found e-cig smoke to increase one’s risk of bladder cancer.

In 2015, the University of Minnesota identified chemicals commonly found in e-cig vapor to include:

  • Formaldehyde (human carcinogen)
  • Acetaldehyde (carcinogen related to alcohol drinking)
  • Acrolein (highly irritating and toxic)
  • Toluene (toxic) NNN, NNK (tobacco carcinogens related to nicotine)
  • Metals (possible carcinogens and toxins)

Although electronic cigarette “juice” may appear safe, it could produce harmful chemicals once heated to become a vapor.

A lethal dose of nicotine for an adult ranges from 30-60 mg and varied for children (0.5-1.0 mg/kg can be a lethal dosage for adults, and 0.1 mg/kg for children).  E-cigs, depending on their strengths (0 – 5.4%) could contain up to 54 mg of nicotine per cartridge (a 1.8% e -cig would contain 18mg/ml).

The topic of nicotine increasing one’s vulnerability to cancer is nothing new as decades ago researchers found nicotine to affect the cilia (brush border) along the respiratory tree, preventing mucous production and a sweeping out of carcinogens trying to make their way down to the lungs.

More research needs to be performed but this recent report reminds us that exposing our delicate lung tissue and immune system to vaping chemicals may not be as safe as we think.

For more on the study read here.

Toxic metals found in vaping liquid

Last week, experts warned that many chemicals in vaping liquid may change to toxic substances (once heated) that can irritate the lungs.

Last year one study reported that toxic levels of lead and other metals may leak from the heating coil element into the vapor inhaled during e-cig use.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found these metals to include:

  • lead
  • nickel
  • manganese
  • chromium
  • arsenic

We’ve known for some time that vaping fluid could contain chemicals that turn toxic once heated, but this study shed light on e-cig metal components causing metal leakage to the vapor making contact with delicate respiratory epithelium (lining).

Reported by Forbes, Rich Able, a medical device marketing consultant, stated the following, “the FDA does not currently test any of the most popular vaping and e-cigarette instruments being manufactured at unregulated factories in Asia that source  low-grade parts, batteries, and materials for the production of these devices,” suggesting that “the metal and parts composition of these devices must be stringently tested for toxic analytes and corrosive compounds.”

These chemicals may act as neurotoxins, affecting our nervous system, cause tissue necrosis (cell death) and even multi-organ failure.  Moreover they can affect how our immune system reacts to other chemicals as well as foreign pathogens, affecting our ability to fight other diseases.

Although studies have suggested e-cig vapor to be safer than tobacco smoke, not enough research has been done, in the relatively few years vaping has been around, looking at how heat-transformed chemicals and leaked metals affect our breathing, lungs and other organs once absorbed into the body.

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, news, vaping

More Reports of Vaping Linked to Seizures in Teens

The FDA is investigating 127 reports of seizures in e-cigarette users (up from 35 this Spring).

Many were teenagers and young adults.

Since 2010 the agency has received multiple reports but is unclear if e-cigarettes actually caused the seizures or if there were underlying medical conditions predisposing the neurological disorder.

The 92 additional cases since this April is concerning and the FDA is working to determine if vaping contributes contributes directly to serious neurological conditions.

In April FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb tweeted:

While we’re still learning about the long-term potential benefits and health risks of e-cigs, existing scientific research offers some clear evidence that several of the dangerous chemicals in tobacco smoke are also present in the aerosol of some e-cig products.

Dr. Ned Sharpless, current acting FDA Commissioner, is encouraging people to report adverse events as, “Additional reports or more detailed information about these incidents are vital to help inform our analysis and may help us identify common risk factors and determine whether any specific e-cigarette product attributes, such as nicotine content or formulation, may be more likely to contribute to seizures,” (Reported by CNBC).

What is a seizure?

A seizure occurs when there is abnormal electrical activity in the brain.  If the electricity doesn’t conduct properly, brain function gets disrupted. This could lead to convulsions  (involuntary jerking movements), loss of muscle tone, changes in senses such as vision, hearing and smell, loss of bladder control, loss of consciousness and sometimes stroke, brain damage and death.

HGT0066_neurons-seizure-brain_FS.jpg

 

Nicotine toxicity has been linked to seizures.  E-cigs sometimes contain more nicotine than cigarettes alone.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

A study published by the American Heart Association found nine different E-cig flavors  to impair blood vessel function, which can impair heart health.

Endothelial cells, which delicately line blood and lymph vessels, were found to become inflamed at low concentrations of some vapor flavors.  And at high concentrations of others, exibited cell death.  Nitric oxide production, necessary for vessel dilation to improve blood flow, was impaired as well. These are often the same changes seen in early heart disease.

sample_01001118_110141.jpg

The 9 flavors (and the chemicals within) cited in the report to cause the endothelial inflammation and/or damage were:

  • Mint (menthol)
  • Vanilla (vanillin)
  • Clove (eugenol)
  • Cinnamon (cinnamaldehyde)
  • Strawberry (dimethylpyrazine)
  • Banana (isoamyl acetate)
  • Butter (diacetyl)
  • Eucalyptus/spicy cooling (eucalyptol)
  • Burnt flavor (acetylpyridine)

Strawberry flavoring appeared to have the most adverse effect on the cells.

Now many other flavors were not included in this study, so its unknown how safe they may be.

For more on the study, read here.

An alternate study published last November looked at vaping flavors and their effects on heart muscle cells.

For more on this study, read here.

The moral?  Just because we love the taste of something, doesn’t mean its safe to inhale.

___________________________________________________________________

Vaping Linked to Heart Disease and Cancer

 

A study from New York University found the nicotine in electronic cigarettes to cause DNA damage similar to cigarette smoking.

Dr. Moon-shong Tang and his colleagues exposed mice to e-cig smoke during a three-month period, 5 days a week for three hours a day.  They found these mice, compared to those breathing filtered air, to have DNA damage to cells in their bladders, lungs and hearts. The amount of nicotine inhaled was approximately 10mg/ml.   That dose would be commonly consumed by many humans who vape.

nicotine.jpg

They then looked at human bladder and lung cells and found tumor cells were able to grow more easily once exposed to nicotine and vaping chemicals.

Last May, researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville found e-cig smoke to increase one’s risk of bladder cancer.

In 2015, the University of Minnesota identified chemicals commonly found in e-cig vapor to include:

  • Formaldehyde (human carcinogen)
  • Acetaldehyde (carcinogen related to alcohol drinking)
  • Acrolein (highly irritating and toxic)
  • Toluene (toxic) NNN, NNK (tobacco carcinogens related to nicotine)
  • Metals (possible carcinogens and toxins)

Although electronic cigarette “juice” may appear safe, it could produce harmful chemicals once heated to become a vapor.

A lethal dose of nicotine for an adult ranges from 30-60 mg and varied for children (0.5-1.0 mg/kg can be a lethal dosage for adults, and 0.1 mg/kg for children).  E-cigs, depending on their strengths (0 – 5.4%) could contain up to 54 mg of nicotine per cartridge (a 1.8% e -cig would contain 18mg/ml).

The topic of nicotine increasing one’s vulnerability to cancer is nothing new as decades ago researchers found nicotine to affect the cilia (brush border) along the respiratory tree, preventing mucous production and a sweeping out of carcinogens trying to make their way down to the lungs.

More research needs to be performed but this recent report reminds us that exposing our delicate lung tissue and immune system to vaping chemicals may not be as safe as we think.

For more on the study read here.

Toxic metals found in vaping liquid

Last week, experts warned that many chemicals in vaping liquid may change to toxic substances (once heated) that can irritate the lungs.

Last year one study reported that toxic levels of lead and other metals may leak from the heating coil element into the vapor inhaled during e-cig use.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found these metals to include:

  • lead
  • nickel
  • manganese
  • chromium
  • arsenic

We’ve known for some time that vaping fluid could contain chemicals that turn toxic once heated, but this study shed light on e-cig metal components causing metal leakage to the vapor making contact with delicate respiratory epithelium (lining).

Reported by Forbes, Rich Able, a medical device marketing consultant, stated the following, “the FDA does not currently test any of the most popular vaping and e-cigarette instruments being manufactured at unregulated factories in Asia that source  low-grade parts, batteries, and materials for the production of these devices,” suggesting that “the metal and parts composition of these devices must be stringently tested for toxic analytes and corrosive compounds.”

These chemicals may act as neurotoxins, affecting our nervous system, cause tissue necrosis (cell death) and even multi-organ failure.  Moreover they can affect how our immune system reacts to other chemicals as well as foreign pathogens, affecting our ability to fight other diseases.

Although studies have suggested e-cig vapor to be safer than tobacco smoke, not enough research has been done, in the relatively few years vaping has been around, looking at how heat-transformed chemicals and leaked metals affect our breathing, lungs and other organs once absorbed into the body.

 

ultimate book cover final

Great Gift!!!

The Ultimate Medical Student HandBook

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in Health, news, teens

“Shell On”, the Latest Challenge, Involves Eating Plastic

The latest challenge sweeping social media is the “Shell On” challenge in which teens Snapchat videos of themselves eating through fruit skin, cardboard boxes and plastic bags containing their food.

Although this appears to not be as dangerous as the Tide Pod or Boiling Water Challenge, it can cause choking and asphyxiation.

 

 

In the video above the teen takes bites out of fruit with their peel and a cereal box.

What other dangerous challenges are out there?

Last year we learned of the “Boiling Water Challenge” in which kids drink boiling water from a straw or have it poured all over their body. Then they topped it off with a more dangerous challenge, the “Fire Challenge.”

The Fire Challenge is executed by pouring rubbing alcohol on one’s body and then setting oneself on fire.  A video records the victim running into a tub or shower to wash it off, and this trend has gone viral.

Unfortunately it’s one of the most dangerous.  A 12 year-old girl from Detroit who participated in this challenge is undergoing multiple surgeries to repair burns afflicting close to 50% of her body.

Multiple cases of the “Fire Challenge” have been reported over the years, including a 12 year-old boy from Georgia.

One would think children, especially teens, innately know that fire is dangerous but maybe the younger generation has been so protected that they haven’t experienced the basic concepts of danger and inadvertently underestimate its force.

 

fire-challenge

Challenges that involve dangerous stunts have been around for some time.  The Choking Challenge induced children to suffocate themselves for the high of feeling asphyxiated.  The Tide Pod Challenge tempted kids to put colorful cleaning packets in their mouths, hoping they wouldn’t burst.

 

download.jpeg.

The Cinnamon Challenge sparked thousands to inhale the common kitchen spice and cough till they puked.  Then the Condom Challenge offered two options where one dropped a condom filled with water on a friends face, or snorted one through the nose.

 

condom-snorting_fef3836eae7396a0afa3cb633b709bb4

We adults can’t for the life of us figure out what the reward is in performing these challenges, but presume its fame and awe among friends and social media followers.  But these challenges prove dangerous and in some cases deadly.  Unfortunately the YouTube Clips never show the after effects of these pranks…maybe they should.

 

IMG_1781

The Baby Boomer’s Guide to Online Dating

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

Posted in children, Health, news, teens

Teens May Fake Being Abducted in the Latest “48-Hour Challenge”

Earlier this month police warned that some teens may be participating in the 48- Hour Challenge.  This latest feat involves the child running away from home and accruing “likes” on social media.

However, this week we learned of two Houston 6th grade girls who had gone missing, with their parents scared out of their minds. Both the girl’s cell phones had been turned off and the parents were obviously hoping they weren’t truly abducted.

KHOU reports that Mary Tran Le, 13, and Tianny Granja, 12, left their homes around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday with their backpacks and never made it to class, days after they spoke to one of their mothers about the challenge.

Fortunately the girls have been found and returned to their families.

When reports of the social media game surfaced, whose mission is to score many likes while you’re “missing”, it could not be confirmed. Yet the average child who hears of these rumors may think it’s an actual challenge and turn rumor into reality.

Police are already stretched thin and image the “Boy Who Cried Wolf” scenario if this challenge goes viral.

What other dangerous challenges are out there?

Last year we learned of the “Boiling Water Challenge” in which kids drink boiling water from a straw or have it poured all over their body. Then they topped it off with a more dangerous challenge, the “Fire Challenge.”

The Fire Challenge is executed by pouring rubbing alcohol on one’s body and then setting oneself on fire.  A video records the victim running into a tub or shower to wash it off, and this trend has gone viral.

Unfortunately it’s one of the most dangerous.  A 12 year-old girl from Detroit who participated in this challenge is undergoing multiple surgeries to repair burns afflicting close to 50% of her body.

Multiple cases of the “Fire Challenge” have been reported over the years, including a 12 year-old boy from Georgia.

One would think children, especially teens, innately know that fire is dangerous but maybe the younger generation has been so protected that they haven’t experienced the basic concepts of danger and inadvertently underestimate its force.

 

fire-challenge

Challenges that involve dangerous stunts have been around for some time.  The Choking Challenge induced children to suffocate themselves for the high of feeling asphyxiated.  The Tide Pod Challenge tempted kids to put colorful cleaning packets in their mouths, hoping they wouldn’t burst.

 

download.jpeg.

The Cinnamon Challenge sparked thousands to inhale the common kitchen spice and cough till they puked.  Then the Condom Challenge offered two options where one dropped a condom filled with water on a friends face, or snorted one through the nose.

 

condom-snorting_fef3836eae7396a0afa3cb633b709bb4

We adults can’t for the life of us figure out what the reward is in performing these challenges, but presume its fame and awe among friends and social media followers.  But these challenges prove dangerous and in some cases deadly.  Unfortunately the YouTube Clips never show the after effects of these pranks…maybe they should.

 

IMG_1781

The Baby Boomer’s Guide to Online Dating

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

 

 

Posted in Health, news, sex

Losing One’s Virginity: Breaking it Down

Many adolescents and young adults ponder this life-altering decision with very little guidance.  And understandably so as discussing losing one’s virginity with one’s parents fails to be a popular dinnertime conversation.  And big brother and sister don’t always give accurate and unbiased advice.

In Biblical times it was easy….one was told to “wait till you’re married.”  The timing, partner, and societal acceptance was already laid out, eliminating much decision-making.

Today, however, there’s immense pressure for both boys and girls to lose one’s virginity, for many as early as middle school.

So the average child or adult contemplating losing one’s virginity relies on social media, television, movies, friends and classmates to help form this decision.

So what does one need to take into account before they lose their virginity?

 

It’s permanent

You’re only a virgin once…..until you lose it, meaning you will never get it back once its lost.  Virginity is not a bad thing so don’t give it up so quickly.  If you have any doubts on who to give it to then he/she is probably not the right person.

 

regret.jpg

 

It’s not the ultimate show of love

Many times teens are goaded into having sex as a sign of their true commitment and love.  Yet there are many other ways when a relationship is new to show your compassion and dedication.  Love is a feeling, not an act.

 

It won’t always resemble what you see in the movies

Unlike what we saw in 50 Shades of Grey, losing one’s virginity may instead be 3 minutes of pain and awkwardness.  Love-making includes love, passion, intamcy…so if that’s how you want to lose your virginity than make sure all the ingredients are there first.

 

50 shades.jpg

 

There is no “golden” age in which one should lose it

In school, students commonly boast about losing one’s virginity before 16.  Yet this random choice of age has no scientific basis.  True, many of us in caveman days had full families before that age, but in today’s society, a teen pregnancy is not that easy.  Which brings us to….

 

You could risk getting pregnant

Most young single teens or adults are not ready to start a family, despite their youthful fertility advantage.  Hence one unprotected sexual encounter could make a soon-to-be ex-virgin a new mom or dad within 9 months.

 

You could risk getting an STI

Likewise a night of what you anticipate to be passion could give you a week, month or lifetime of a sexually transmitted illness.  Condoms are a must.

 

Many may lose their virginity when they don’t want to

Tragically many who engage in pre-sexual activity such as foreplay or 1st through 3rd bases may find themselves in a situation where their partner advances to penetration without their consent.  Many thus lose their virginity to rape.

 

Regrets

A recent study last summer carried out by ZavaMed found 31% of those surveyed , specifically 45% of women, regretted how they lost their virginity.  Unfortunately they can’t take that moment back. Which brings us to….

 

Alcohol is not your friend

Many unfortunately lose their virginity when they lose their inhibitions due to alcohol.  One drink is all it takes to bring one’s guard down.

 

jello shots.jpg

 

There’s no doubt losing one’s virginity is a rite of passage into adulthood. It could be the most amazing  and beautiful moment or one full of cringeful regret.  So don’t rush into giving away what could be your most precious commodity.

 

spanish book

Learning Medical Spanish is Easy!!!

 

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network and Board Certified Family Physician

Posted in Health, news

Today’s Health Headlines

Loss of smell may be first sign of Alzheimer’s
This is another study citing how loss of smell could be the first sign of dementia and/or Alzheimer’s, one day being a successful and inexpensive screening test.
 
Zika virus may not be working alone
When mosquitoes carry disease they aren’t picky as to which.  Scientists wonder if dengue and chikungunya could be coinfecting with some bites making neurological symptoms worse.

 

Our cell phones can contain sediments of everything we’re exposed to

Much of what we’re exposed to in every day life apparently can be found in traces on our cell phones.  UCSD scientists were able to make a “lifestyle profile” of the phone owner and this data can later be used for a variety of health applications.

Adolescent depression on the rise, especially in girls


 A significant climb has been observed over the last few years and many aren’t receiving treatment.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/14/health/depression-teen-girls/

 

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network and Board Certified Family Physician

 

Posted in Health, news

Today’s Health Headlines

September 26, 2016

Disneyland trip could help dislodge kidney stones

Many of us with kidney stones are told NOT to ride a roller coaster as they could dislodge. In this new study, however, roller coasters, such as those at Disneyland/World/Six Flags could be just what the patient needs to help them to pass.

http://www.livescience.com/56261-kidney-stones-roller-coaster.html

Morning sickness hints to a HEALTHY pregnancy
It appears that those who experience the notorious nausea and vomiting were 50-75% less likely to experience subsequent miscarriage in those who had a first one.
90% of teens don’t get enough exercise
Exercise shouldn’t stop when PE isn’t required anymore, and its recommended that most teens get at least one hour of exercise a day.  Sex should not count. And strength building exercises help their bones as well.
 

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/teens-dont-get-enough-exercise/

Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, iHeart Radio and Board Certified Family Physician