Posted in art, Health, news

Eye Condition Might Have Helped Leonardo da Vinci Create His Masterpieces

A British researcher believes the Renaissance artisan, Leonardo da Vinci, had an eye condition called strabismus, or “lazy eye”, providing him a different sense of depth when it came to painting.

His specific strabismus was an exotropia, in which one eye moves outward, out of sync with the unaffected eye.

 

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Study author, Christopher Tyler, professor at City University of London and the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, states, “One of the things he is most famous for is his 3-D modeling [in which he adds] up to 30 layers of shading to get the subtle gradients.

“This is the kind of cue you don’t notice if you have full 3-D vision, but [it] can become more apparent if you shut — or shut off — one eye.”

Interestingly, in one of his famous works, the Mona Lisa, one could see a swelling of her left hand.

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She was the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, and appears to have a lump under her second finger.  This could have been a ganglion cyst or a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath.

Strabismus affects 4% of Americans, many of whom do not feel any visual deficits.  Some, however, may infer a strain of the field of vision, and some may incur double vision.

Treatment may include glasses, eye therapy, and surgery.

 

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Daliah Wachs, MD, FAAFP is a nationally syndicated radio personality on GCN Network, KDWN, and iHeart Radio.

She is also a Board Certified Family Physician and Assistant Professor at Touro University Nevada